Academic journal article Education Libraries (Online)

Invisible Sphere of Influence

Academic journal article Education Libraries (Online)

Invisible Sphere of Influence

Article excerpt

Among the many fine articles in this issue, the topic of mentorship strikes a chord. Jeremy Denk in a recent New Yorker recalls several of his piano teachers. During one of his recitals, he played some unintended notes. He heard his former teacher's voice in his head, telling him not to be a perfectionist. How many of us conjure up the ghosts of former mentors or teachers while we are struggling, trying to make sense?

At an advisory meeting of our local library school, a faculty member asked about the importance of offering a cataloging course, and the impact it would have on graduates finding jobs. I couldn't help but hear C. Donald Cook, my cataloging professor at the University of Toronto, weighing in on the debate. He would emphasize the core of cataloging saying that organizing information no matter what it is called is essential to what we do; who we are. Professor Cook knew that cataloging is the road map, guide, infrastructure, and cornerstone to accessing information.

At this time of my career, I think of those who had a profound influence upon me from Professors Cook, Fasick, England, and Neale from the U of T to the librarians with whom I worked at the Chicago Municipal Reference Library in the 1980s. …

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