Academic journal article Journal of Psychosocial Research

Interpersonal and Priority Needs: A Study on Employees of Small Scale Industries

Academic journal article Journal of Psychosocial Research

Interpersonal and Priority Needs: A Study on Employees of Small Scale Industries

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

Small scale industries are characterized by the unique feature of labour intensiveness. The importance of this industry increases manifold due to the immense employment generating potential. The countries which are characterized by acute unemployment especially put emphasis on the model of small scale industries. In a country like India where unemployment is a serious problem, small scale industries and their labour intensive approach is of a huge and great advantage. The absorption of the surplus amount of labour helps the total system in scaling down the extent of unemployment and of course, poverty. In spite of all these advantages, small scale industries are still facing some problems which can be considered as a serious threat to the development of a country. Among many, some of the important problems of small scale industries are : problem of finance, problem of raw material, problem of power, problem of marketing, problem of technical know how, export difficulties, growing sickness and mortality, no significant representation, unfriendly taxation, lack of efficient management and problem of industrial and interpersonal relations. The major challenge for small scale industries is to provide innovative and customized products using the best available process technologies. Improvements in competitors' capabilities have shortened product life cycles, elevated product complexity and expanded accessibility to new technical breakthroughs (Gupta and Garret, 1996). According to Ajitabh and Moyama (2004) in such kind of environment, firm's competitiveness will depend on its ability to provide goods and services more efficiently than others involved in the market place. Small firm with limited resources will be expected to perceive its business environment as being different from that of a large firm with perhaps more resources and it is also likely to face different environmental pressures with regard to competitiveness in market (Gyampah et al., 2001). The approaches that a large firm uses to benchmark its competitors and negotiate with suppliers are expected to be different from the approaches used by small firm (Vickery et al., 1999). The main barriers to be competitive for small scale industries are inadequate technologies as well as inadequate in house human expertise and poor financial resources (Armstrong and Coyle, 1999). Resource scarcity can impact on the ability of smaller firms to enter export markets and can also limit a smaller firm's ability to reach more advanced stages of internationalization (Moen, 1999). Pun et al. (2004) have observed that for electronics industry in Hong Kong, product/service quality and customer services have emerged as the critical success factors. Singh et al., (2004) have also observed same findings in their study for Indian auto component sector. Neely et al. (1994) defined performance measurement as the process of quantifying the efficiency and effectiveness of manufacturing system. Performance of an enterprise is often measured as a ratio of output to input. The outputs constitute the products of the enterprise and the inputs are the resources used by the enterprise (Choudhary, 2001). Performance of an organization relative to its industry standards is termed as its competitiveness (Ghemawat, 1990). Considering the above the present investigation has been designed to study the interpersonal and priority need as expressed by the employees of small scale bakery industry and small scale mechanical engineering industry.

OBJECTIVES

1. To study the interpersonal needs as perceived by the employees of small scale bakery industry and small scale mechanical engineering industry.

2. To study the priority needs as perceived by the employees of small scale bakery industry and small scale mechanical engineering industry.

HYPOTHESES

Hypothesis - I

The expressed (other directed) and the wanted (self-directed) inclusion need of the employees of bakery and mechanical engineering industry differ significantly. …

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