Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

Trainees' and Trainers' Perspectives on Effectiveness of Clinical Training for Nursing Students in Kenya

Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

Trainees' and Trainers' Perspectives on Effectiveness of Clinical Training for Nursing Students in Kenya

Article excerpt

Abstract

Although nurse training has been undertaken for over two decades, holistic evaluation of clinical teaching has not been documented. The purpose of the study was to determine students and trainers perspectives on effectiveness in clinical training of nurses in Kenya. This was a descriptive survey. The target population was third year Kenya Registered Community Health Nursing Students, lecturers and the supervisors in the clinical training sites. The study should have included the community who are the recipients of the services but because of finance and time limitations, it was not possible. Fourteen KMTCs and fifteen institutions where students are placed for clinical experience was selected for the study. Self administered questionnaires were utilized. Data entry was done in EPI-info and SPSS version 12.0 was used for data analysis. Clinical training in across the three specialty areas of nursing is effective (221) 79% students, (174) 69% clinical supervisors and teachers (29) 70%; effectiveness in midwifery was (244) 87% students (194) 77% clinical supervisors and teachers (32) 75%; effectiveness in Community health nursing was (238) 85% students, (194) 77% clinical supervisors and teachers (32) 77%. Clinical training is an effective method of skill acquisition in nurse training. Limited resources constrain clinical teaching

Keywords: trainees, trainers, clinical, nursing, Kenya.

INTRODUCTION

"Trainees and trainers perspectives on effectiveness of clinical training of nursing students in Kenya "arise out of the contention that developed and developing countries, Kenya included use clinical placement in training of their health professionals. Emerging trends in nursing education at diploma level suggest new paradigms in the overall approach to clinical skills acquisition. The nursing program lasts three and half years. However, with enlargement of the curriculum from general nursing to focus on three areas; general nursing, midwifery and community health nursing, the duration of the training remains the same. This poses challenges to acquisition and demonstration of competence expected of the nurse. Clinical training has been and still continues to be widely used in training for the purpose of acquisition of practical skills, (UHN 2004). Taylor in the period of industrial revolution used industrial attachment, which in essence is a form of understudying to boost productivity. When this is looked at traditionally, it can be labeled an "apprenticeship".

Health care training for a long time has all over the World used apprenticeship for training of health personnel. Clinical placement in traditional medical education for doctors, nurses and other allied health professionals has always utilized the concept of apprenticeship. This approach of training has been criticized for being opportunistic and unsystematic, (Harden, 1986). Much of the criticisms have tended to focus on unstructured nature of clinical placement since it is very hard to plan for the type of experience you are not sure the student will experience. The learning depends on availability of the relevant clinical cases. Increasing number of students is another challenge in placement for clinical experience as new training institutions are utilizing the same limited resources.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY

The purpose of the study was to determine trainee/trainer perspectives on effectiveness of clinical training for nurses in Kenya. The primary concern of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference in ranking between students, clinical supervisors and teachers regarding effectiveness according to the three specialty areas of nursing. Problems being encountered that interfere with effectiveness of clinical training of nurses should not escape the notice or attention of the policy makers; neither should that be left to chance.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

Determine trainees' and trainers perspectives on the effectiveness of clinical training in Reproductive Health Nursing as a specialty area of nursing. …

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