Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Social Stereotypes in Communicative Formulae: Sociometric Approach

Academic journal article Asian Social Science

Social Stereotypes in Communicative Formulae: Sociometric Approach

Article excerpt

Abstract

The focus of the article is centered on society through the prism of communication. Modern data extraction and information retrieval methods allow building a new vision of communicative process. The article is focused on the example of language idiom representations and omnibus survey, which help concentrate on the most stable human society ways of expression. There is also an attempt to carry out a comparative analysis of social features of the East and the West with the help of on-line national languages' corpuses. Omnibus survey results testify to the fact that low income people are reluctant to admit the influence of idioms on their day-to-day communicative practices, while rich people stress the significance of stable communicative formulae in their life. Societies are described through their attitude to labor, expressed in the idioms with a 'hand' component. With the help of electronic linguistic corpuses (Corpus of the Internet and business Chinese), KOTONOHA (Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese), BNC (British National Corpus), COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English) the research analyzes labor stereotypes on the basis of idiom frequency indexes. In practice the results of this study can be implemented in a special socio-cultural dictionary, where the most frequent idioms are given as social stereotypes and the most powerful symbolic tools of influence and manipulation. The results of these findings are relevant to multicultural societies, migration adaptation practices and global business development. The research results have been processed into a database, marked with the Rospatent Certificate No 2013620397, dated 03/13/2013.

Keywords: society, communication, idiom, data extraction, information retrieval

1. Introduction

For more than 6000 years society members have been channeling themselves through communication - from cave paintings to Facebook pages content. As S. Benhabib has masterfully formulated: 'To be and to become a self is to insert oneself into webs of interlocution' (Benhabib, 2002). Sociology uses a number of communicative methods, based on interviewing people (see Lamont & Swidler, 2014).

The approach is based on the assumption that for sociological purposes it is possible to concentrate on analyzing the language itself, rather than employing it as a useful tool. But the world of language is vast. Which language items are of primary importance for describing social mechanics? The proposed answer is the domain of idioms, as they represent culture connotations, codes and symbols, describing the ideas of 'good' and 'bad' in every society. In his spectacular work Jeffrey C. Alexander specified the road, taken by the notion of Holocaust from the simple idiom of 'atrocities of war' to the Testament idiom 'the dominant evil of our time' (Alexander, 2003).

With the help of Serelex system of semantically related words (Panchenko et al., 2013) a list of semantically related words to the head word 'idiom' was extracted (see Graph 1).

The figure demonstrates that idioms have been a part of society life for centuries, dating back to Gregorian chants and up to such exclamations as: eeee, ooooh and programming idioms in the 21st century.

Though society members are reluctant to admit the fact that they are governed by idiomatic stereotypes, it is possible to insist on the assumption that moral standards, fixed in idioms, are transferred from generation to generation. They perform the function of prior impressions, which affect our present perception: 'in every case the perceptual process is the same: Prior experience colors perception' (Goldstein et al., 2008). The hypothesis is that societies neglect the importance of idiomatic stereotypes in their day-to-day life, though they are driven by them.

The figure demonstrates that idioms have been a part of society life for centuries, dating back to Gregorian chants and up to such exclamations as: eeee, ooooh and programming idioms in the 21st century. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.