Academic journal article Studies in Literature and Language

The Six Principles of Chinese Writing and Their Application to Design as Design Idea

Academic journal article Studies in Literature and Language

The Six Principles of Chinese Writing and Their Application to Design as Design Idea

Article excerpt

Abstract

Given the impact that nationality and locality have on the essential elements of design, it is a demanding task for Chinese designers to set up new Chinese design styles. In my opinion, the Six Principles of Chinese Writing (...), which are the principles of Chinese characters' formation and application, is a set of design idea that can be applied to modern design. In this paper, I present my research on the new design idea of design based on the Six Principles of Chinese writing with mark design as examples. I analyse the six principles seriatim as design thoughts, and relate them with modern design methods. Finally, I draw my conclusion that graphic design based on the Six Principles of Chinese writing comprises a set of effective design idea and is one of the characteristic design methods in China which will carry forward the Chinese designs.

Key words: The six principles of Chinese writing; Design idea; Mark design

(ProQuest: ... denotes non-US-ASCII text omitted.)

INTRODUCTION

The Chinese character, a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and formerly Vietnamese, is the most widely used and perhaps the oldest surviving writing system in the world. More than that, it is the most representative cultural symbol of China.

The Six Principles are the principles of Chinese characters' formation and application which was developed during the formation of Chinese characters. As an open set with new characters constantly being developed, the total number of Chinese characters from past to present reaches a tremendous sum. The Chinese dictionary published by the People's Republic of China in 1989 covered about 56,000 characters. It is really amazing that such huge and complicated character-formation can be generalized by only six principles. =

In my opinion, the Six Principles comprise a set of design thoughts based on using graphics to indicate meanings. From this standpoint, the Six Principles can be regarded as an effective design method which can be applied to modern design, especially in the field of visual expression design. In this paper, I present my research on the new mark design idea based on the Six Principles and testified their feasibility with marks designed by myself and other Chinese designers.

1. FORMATION OF CHINESE CHARACTERS

Although Chinese characters are often called ideograms, only a handful fit this category in any sense. Traditionally, Chinese characters have been divided into six different categories according to the principles of their composition: Pictograms, Simple Indicatives, Compound Indicatives, Phono-semantic Compounds, Associate Transformations and Borrowing ( Zuo, 2005).

Traditional Chinese lexicography divided characters into six categories (...), which are described below. This classification system is often attributed to Xu Shen's (...) second century dictionary, the Shuowen jiezi (..., "Explaining Simple and Analyzing Compound Characters"), written in the Eastern Han Dynasty. This was the first comprehensive Chinese character dictionary- the first to analyze the components and etymology of the characters. But in fact, its roots are earlier; the first mention of it is in the Rites of Zhou (...) of the late Zhou dynasty, and the types are listed in the Hanshu from the first century CE, as well as by Zheng Zhong in a first century CE Zhouli commentary (...), although the details vary slightly. Nowadays, Xu Shen's nomenclature and Ban Gu's order about Liushu are usually used, which is as follows: Pictograms(...), Simple indicatives(...), Compound indicatives(...), Phono-semantic compounds (...), Derived (...) and Borrowed characters (...) (Wang, 2003; http://e.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_ character).

The traditional classification is still taught but is no longer the focus of modern lexicographic practice. Some categories are not clearly defined, nor are they mutually exclusive: the first four refer to structural composition, while the last two refer to usage. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.