Academic journal article Contemporary Nurse : a Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession

Mothers' Knowledge, Health Beliefs and Intentions to Vaccinate Their Daughters against Human Papillomavirus in Korea

Academic journal article Contemporary Nurse : a Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession

Mothers' Knowledge, Health Beliefs and Intentions to Vaccinate Their Daughters against Human Papillomavirus in Korea

Article excerpt

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for cervical cancer (Moscicki, 2008). HPV has been detected in more than 90% of patients with cervical cancer. In particular, it has been reported that HPV-16 and HPV-18 account for more than 70% of the cases of cervical cancer (Bosch & Munoz, 2002). According to the data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2013), the incidence of cervical cancer in Korea (10.8 per 100,000 persons per year) was higher than the average rate among more devel- oped regions the United States (9 per 100,000 persons per year).

Recently, an HPV vaccine with proven efficacy has been developed, and it has been approved by 80 countries, including the USA's and Korea's Food & Drug Administrations. The USA and Korea recommend that 9-26-year-old girls and women receive the vaccine (Rhee et al., 2010). HPV vaccination has generated hope of substan- tially lowering the incidence of cervical cancer (Kim, Park, & Park, 2010; Kwan et al., 2009). Therefore, to prevent cervical cancer, it is impor- tant for the target population to accept HPV vaccination and receive the vaccine. Mothers' acceptance and behavioral intentions to have their daughters vaccinated have a major impact on HPV vaccination (Dempsey, Abraham, Dalton, & Ruffin, 2009; Waller, Marlow, & Wardle, 2006).

Knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccination are very important factors that increase behav- ioral intentions to receive the vaccine (Choi et al., 2008; Rosenstock, Strecher, & Becker, 1988; Walsh et al., 2008), but it has been reported that the understanding of knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccination are low among the general public (Choi et al., 2008; Walsh et al., 2008). In addition, health beliefs about vaccina- tion promote behavioral intentions to vaccinate and have an important impact on vaccination (Kahn, Rosenthal, Hamann, & Bernstein, 2003). Accordingly, it is important to provide mothers of daughters with knowledge about HPV and to improve their health beliefs about vaccination.

This study, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM), considered behavioral intentions, which are a preceding factor of compliance with a preventive health behavior, as a key variable. Rosenstock et al. (1988) reported that knowledge has direct and indirect influences on behavioral intentions. The HBM consists of five constructs proposed to influence the likelihood that an indi- vidual will engage in a given health behavior to avoid an undesirable health consequence. These constructs include perceived susceptibility (the perceived likelihood that one will experience a consequence), perceived severity (the perceived seriousness of the consequences associated with the condition), perceived benefits (the potential advantages of engaging in the health behavior to prevent the undesired consequence), and per- ceived barriers (the perceived obstacles to engag- ing in the health behavior). Cues to action, which represent the fifth construct, trigger appropri- ate health behaviors (Becker & Maiman, 1975; Rosenstock et al., 1988). The HBM has been used in previous studies to identify beliefs about HPV, cervical cancer, and the acceptability of the HPV vaccine among women (Hsu et al., 2009; Kahn et al., 2003; Lopez & McMahan, 2007; Marlow, Forster, Wardle, & Waller, 2009). However, the authors of previous studies are unaware of any Korean studies based on the HBM that have been conducted to identify the factors associated with mother's intentions to vaccinate their daughters and themselves. Those types of studies have been conducted in different cultures.

The aims of this study were to examine moth- ers' intentions to vaccinate their daughters against HPV and the factors associated with mothers' intentions to vaccinate their daughters. The spe- cific aims of this study are as follows: (a) to identify the differences in mothers' intentions to vaccinate their daughters against HPV by the participants' demographic and HPV-related characteristics, (b) to measure the participants' knowledge and health beliefs about HPV and HPV vaccination and their intentions to received the HPV vac- cine, (c) to assess the correlation between the participants' knowledge and health beliefs about HPV and HPV vaccination and their intentions to vaccinate their daughters against HPV, and (d) to identify the factors associated with the participants' intentions to vaccinate their daugh- ters against HPV. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.