Academic journal article International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences

Gender Differences in Risk Perception and Precautionary Behaviour among Residents of Nigerian Yoruba Traditional City

Academic journal article International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences

Gender Differences in Risk Perception and Precautionary Behaviour among Residents of Nigerian Yoruba Traditional City

Article excerpt

(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)

Introduction

Recently, fear of crime, risk perception and the use of precaution measures have become an increasingly significant concern of spatial planners, criminologists, victimologists, policy-makers, politicians, policing organizations, the media and the general public. This is because safety from crime, violence at home, on the streets and in the general environment as well as observed and perceived feeling of risk are important parameters for determining residents' quality of life and are as well viewed as uncompromising products of good governance (Agbola, 2004). In this regard, while the majority of residents living in Nigerian Yoruba Traditional Cities were satisfied with their personal safety from crime, many have been found in the habit of taking precautions to protect themselves from being victimized and some experience fear of crime on daily basis (Badiora 2012; Badiora, Fadoyin, & Omisore, 2013).

Evidence from previous researches around the World show that perceived risk of victimization and uses of precautions are not equal between men and women nor used equally among all age groups (Reid & Konrad, 2004; Gannon 2005; Gannon and Taylor- Butts 2006 & Keown, 2007; Hilinski, Pentecost-Neeson, & Andrews, 2011). In similar vein, Gannon (2005) and Gannon and Taylor-Butts (2006) argue that it is likely that perceptions and fear of crime, as well as the use of precautions to avoid becoming a victim of crime differ between those living in urban and rural areas. In addition, even between those living in urban areas of different sizes, it is likely that perceptions and fear of crime, as well as the use of precautions to avoid becoming a victim of crime differ (Keown 2007a; 2007b).

Previous studies such as Skogan and Maxfield (1981); Gordon, LeBailly and Riger (1982) and Gannon and Taylor-Butts (2006) have also noted that there are differences between men and women in the use of certain protective measures such as installing special security door locks and burglar alarms for protection but these are less pronounced than the gender differences seen in precautions that limit some forms of daily activities. This may be due to the fact that installing special security door locks and burglar alarms are lifetime measures which are more focused on activities related to household collective actions and experiences than on an individual's actions and experiences.

Using data obtained from the survey of residents in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, this study examines differences in perceptions of crime, feeling of safety and use of precautionary behaviour to avoid victimization for the residents. Perceptions considered include perceptions of neighbourhood crime and measures of fear of crime. Precautions taken by men and women to avoid victimization include behaviour that limit some forms of daily activity which include staying home at night to avoid being a victim of crime (avoidance) and habitual behaviour which are engaged in to reduce exposure to crime and limit the possibility of victimization are locking doors from behind when alone at home, carrying something for self-defense and planning route with safety in mind.

This paper specifically focuses on determining whether there are differences in the perceptions of neighbourhood crime, feeling of safety and the use of precaution measures between men and women in Nigerian Yoruba Traditional City. If existed, the paper further examines whether any gender differences persist once other socio-economic and demographic variables such as age, income, level of education, household size among others that may influence perception of neighbourhood crime, feeling of safety as well as the use of precautions have been taken into consideration.

Methods

The study population consists of the adult resident not below the age of 22 years and who had lived in the study area for at least 5 years. The group for this study was chosen because it represents a significant portion of the population under study and this age group may exhibit different perceptions of neighbourhood crime and feeling of safety than young ones below age of 22 years. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.