Academic journal article International Education Studies

Taiwanese Parents' Beliefs regarding Young Children's Art Education and the Actual Art Achievements of Children

Academic journal article International Education Studies

Taiwanese Parents' Beliefs regarding Young Children's Art Education and the Actual Art Achievements of Children

Article excerpt

Abstract

The research goal is to ascertain the current beliefs of the parents of preschool children regarding art education in Taiwan. Background factors on the parents were tested to show the differences between the parents' beliefs regarding art education and the actual art achievements of the children. From there, relationships between the beliefs and the actual achievements were analyzed and established. The researcher prepared the self-completion survey and distributed 400 copies to parents; 268 copies were returned with an effective return rate of 67%.The findings were as follows:

I. Preschool parents viewed children's art education from four aspects-children's artistic development, children's art courses, parental art beliefs, and teachers' professionalism in art.

II. Differences in the art education beliefs of preschool parents with different background factors:

A. Parents from different types of preschools show significant differences in terms of the children's art curriculum.

B. Parents' gender shows significant differences toward their beliefs regarding art education.

C. Parents' education shows significance differences in the dimension of children's art courses.

D. The location of the family residence shows significant differences in parental beliefs regarding art education.

III. Differences in children's achievements in art education depend on the different background factors of the preschool parents:

A. The location of the family residence shows significant differences in children's art satisfaction.

IV. Parental approval of children's learning outcomes is in direct proportion to preschool parental beliefs regarding art education.

V. Preschool parental beliefs regarding art education are predictive of children's learning outcomes, especially in the area of children's art courses.

Keywords: art achievements in preschool classes, children's art education, parental beliefs

1. Introduction

The researcher has been teaching preschool art and aesthetic education for over a decade, and one observation is that parents with different characteristics often demonstrate completely different reactions to the aesthetic creations of their children. When the children's artworks are displayed in public by the teacher, the children are filled with excitement, and to share this excitement, they drag their parents or family to the see their artwork with the expectation of hearing words of approval. In situations like these, the researcher has observed all kinds of responses from the parents or families and summarizes them as the following three scenarios: (1) the parents or family immediately praise the children upon seeing their artwork: "Great job" or "It's beautifully done!" (2) The parents or family see the artwork and give a nod or verbal response: "So this is your work," indicating their awareness of the authorship of the artwork. (3) The parents or family would look at their children's artwork and provide negative and critical responses, such as "That doesn't look like a dog to me," "John's a much better painter than you," and "You messed the colors up".

The above three scenarios actually happened and attracted the researcher to engage in an in-depth investigation of how parents look at preschool children's development in art. Sifting through and summarizing related literature, the researcher found that most studies on preschool art education have focused on the teachers' perspective of art education in Taiwan. However, only a few studies, most of which primarily targeted "after-school art classes", have explored the parents of these children. Some western researchers have proved that significant differences in the beliefs of children art education between parents of different background factors (Anning, 2002; Burkitt, Jolley, & Rose, 2010; Elliot, 1987; Huntsinger, Jose, Krieg, & Luo, 2011; Kantner & Hoffman,1992; Rose, Jolle, & Burkitt, 2006). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.