Academic journal article Boston University Law Review

Utopia as Dystopia?: A Symposium on Sotirios A. Barber's the Fallacies of States' Rights and Michael S. Greve's the Upside-Down Constitution

Academic journal article Boston University Law Review

Utopia as Dystopia?: A Symposium on Sotirios A. Barber's the Fallacies of States' Rights and Michael S. Greve's the Upside-Down Constitution

Article excerpt

EDITORS' FOREWORD

The Boston University Law Review is pleased to publish this symposium on Sotirios Barber's The Fallacies of States' Rights and Michael Greve's The Upside-Down Constitution. This symposium is the third in the Boston University Law Review's series of symposia on significant recent books in law. The distinctive format is to pick two significant books that join issue on an important topic, invite the authors to write an essay on one another's books, and invite several Boston University faculty to write an essay on one or both books.

The symposium took place on November 16, 2013 at Boston University School of Law as one panel in a larger symposium titled "America's Political Dysfunction: Constitutional Connections, Causes, and Cures."1 The title of the panel was "Utopia as Dystopia?" The question for discussion was whether we have reached a dysfunctional situation in which disagreement about constitutional visions is so fundamental that one side's ideal is the other's nightmare, and vice versa. The panelists considered this question with respect to the case of Barber's and Greve's radically opposed visions of federalism. Barber's ideal of a strong national government with all powers necessary to pursue the positive benefits proclaimed in the preamble would be Greve's nightmare, and Greve's ideal of federalism would be Barber's "fallacious" nightmare. …

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