Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

The Predictive Effectiveness of Gender and Peer Pressure on Parents-Adolescent Conflict in Imo State, Nigeria

Academic journal article Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies

The Predictive Effectiveness of Gender and Peer Pressure on Parents-Adolescent Conflict in Imo State, Nigeria

Article excerpt

Abstract

Parent child conflict increases as children move into adolescence. This trend is common and can be quite distressing for parents and adolescents. In its serious form, the highly stressful home environment may lead to the development of adolescent problem behavior. The researcher therefore wants to find out the predictive effectiveness of gender and peer pressure on parent-adolescent conflict in Imo State, Nigeria. The findings of this study if disseminated through conferences, publication and government orientation agencies are expected to be beneficial to social workers like the medical personnel, clinicians and school counselors who are constantly consulted by troubled parents and adolescents for counseling and remediation therapies. The reading public also would be able to gather from the findings of the study, the skills that are required to be a successful parent of an adolescent. Correlational survey method was employed. Sample of the study comprised of 600 senior secondary school students. Data was collected using parent adolescent conflict questionnaire (PACQ). Two research questions and one null hypothesis guided the study. Analysis was done using chi-square and regression analysis. Among the major findings include: there is statistically significant relationship between parent-adolescent conflict and gender ad (2) there is also significant relationship between peer pressure and parent adolescent conflict. Recommendations made include: that parents-child rearing program should emphasize enough, the new abilities and problems that occur during adolescence and the crucial need to adjust parenting style to these changes, as the skills that are required to be a successful parent of a child may not be the same as those necessary during the adolescent years.

Keywords: gender, peer pressure, adolescent adolescence, parents and conflict

INTRODUCTION

Parent-child conflict increases as children move into adolescence. This trend is common and could be quite distressful for parents and adolescents. Parents may wonder why their formerly cooperative and responsible children now seem hostile and destructive. They may perceive their children behavior as resistant and oppositional and may respond to this perceived lack of cooperation with increasing pressure for future compliance. To the growing adolescents, they perceive this increasing pressure by parents as a reduction in their autonomy, just when they want more. This increased stress in parent -adolescent relations may result to negative adolescent behavioural outcomes. For instance, adolescents who dropped out of school in comparism to those who completed their school programme reported more conflict and less communication with parents (Montemoyer, 2002). Equally, teenage girls who reported that their relations with their parents were more stressful are likely to marry early than their school mates who reported calm relations with their parents. Montemoyor (2002) also found that frequent parent adolescent conflict would result to greater peer involvement. The questions at this juncture are: Has parent-adolescent conflict anything to do with gender? To what extent does peer pressure influence parent-adolescent conflict? Providing answers to these questions form the main thrust of this study.

Adolescence is a period of several years marked by rapid physical and psychosocial changes. It is a unique period of several years marked physical, social and psychological changes and the people that occupy the stage are known as adolescents (Opara, 2004). As children turn into adolescents, family relationships are altered as the process of differentiation begins to take place Phinney and Ong (2002). Many researchers (Opara, 2010; Erikson, 1969) associate these changes that characterize this new stage of development with conflict, tension and turmoil. Equally they see the changes that occur as being responsible for the disruption in the adolescents thought processes which also disrupt the smooth functioning system between them and their parents. …

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