Academic journal article Career Planning and Adult Development Journal

Hispanic Nation: Culture, Politics, and the Constructing of Identity

Academic journal article Career Planning and Adult Development Journal

Hispanic Nation: Culture, Politics, and the Constructing of Identity

Article excerpt

Hispanic Nation: Culture, Politics, and the Constructing of Identity, by Geoffrey Fox. 1996. Tucson AZ: University of Arizona Press. 241 Pages. Hardcover. $22.50

The author's main purpose is to assist the reader to a better understanding of the origin and history of the Hispanic culture. The distinction and growth of political, racial and regional characteristics of Hispanic versus Latino/a, Chicano/a or any other Spanish-influenced heritage is made throughout. The book could be used at the high school level but it is better suited for classes at the college or graduate level. This would be an excellent read for anyone who is interested in learning more about the world around them and the emerging Hispanic Nation within the United States.

Geoffrey Fox's Hispanic Nation was certainly educational! I learned more about the evolution of the Hispanic culture than I had planned on prior to reading his book. Surprisingly, I also learned a great deal about Cuban, Puerto Rican and Latino/a cultures. The author systematically details historical events and then-current trends that aided in establishing a Hispanic culture in the United States that he terms as simply an "imagined community" by those that self-identify as Hispanic.

Not having a true physical country to call home leaves for quite a bit of speculation as to how this imagined community emerged in opposition to other already predominantely Spanish-speaking cultures with a definitive homeland. He takes the reader through advances, and regressions, in media/communication, economic ebbs and tides, and political unrest/ conquests to substantiate his case as to why the Hispanic Nation has come into being and is seemingly growing stronger and prouder.

The power struggles that evolved between the Spanish-speaking cultures and the subsequent immigration to specific areas of the country are clearly outlined. The author claims, and many would undeniably agree, that an overriding influence in creating the Hispanic Nation throughout the last few decades has been media, both in print form and television and radio. I felt that the prevailing educational piece in the entire book was the identity shift of what is, supposedly, known by the criollo (one from here) of the United States and Mexican or Spanish-speaking cultures. How does a white person [gringo] distinguish between the Hispanic, Puerto Ricans, Latino/a, Spaniards, Venezuelan or Chicano/a to name a few? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.