Academic journal article Journal of Leisure Research

Parent and Child Perspectives of Family Leisure Involvement and Satisfaction with Family Life

Academic journal article Journal of Leisure Research

Parent and Child Perspectives of Family Leisure Involvement and Satisfaction with Family Life

Article excerpt

Researchers have consistently reported positive relationships between participation in joint leisure activities and satisfaction with family life (Holman, 1981; Holman & Jacquart, 1988; Miller, 1976; Orthner, 1975; Smith, Snyder, & Monsma, 1988). These findings have been demonstrated in national and international samples, including those from Australia, England, and Korea (Ahn, 1982; Bell, 1975; Palisi, 1984). Similarly, when studying individuals, researchers have also consistently reported a positive relationship between leisure involvement and life satisfaction (Metzelaars, 1994; Ragheb & Griffith, 1982; Riddick 1986). Pavot and Diener (1993) characterized life satisfaction as the cognitive component of subjective well-being noting that it tends to be more stable over time than the hedonic component of subjective well being, and is a prime indicator of an individual's quality of life. As noted above, a family's joint leisure involvement is positively related to family satisfaction, and family satisfaction is a primary indicator of the quality of family life. However, most previous studies have examined only the leisure of married couples and satisfaction with their marital relationships. Inferences have then been made suggesting that the effects of joint leisure involvement must be similar for the broader family system. Until recently researchers have not specifically examined perceptions of satisfaction with family life (notable exceptions are Scholl, McAvoy, & Smith, 1999 and Shaw, 1999), and none have done so from multiple perspectives within the same family system. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family leisure involvement and satisfaction with family life from parent, child, and family level perspectives.

Review of Literature

There has been an increase in the volume of research related to life satisfaction in the last decade. Many approaches to the study of life satisfaction are derived from Shin and Johnson's (1978) definition that explained the construct as a judgmental process in which individuals assess the quality of their lives based on their own set of criteria. Pavot and Diener (1993) elaborated to explain that a comparison is made between one's perceived life circumstances and a self-imposed set of standards. An individual will report higher life satisfaction according to the degree that the perceived conditions match the self-imposed standards. Therefore, "life satisfaction is a conscious cognitive judgment of one's life in which the criteria for judgment are up to the person" (p. 164). These criteria often include satisfaction with various domains of life, one of which is leisure involvement. Several studies have reported significant correlations between satisfaction with one's leisure and satisfaction with one's life (Metzelaars, 1994; Ragheb & Griffith, 1982; Trafton & Tinsley, 1980). Riddick (1986) argued that findings of a number of studies suggest that satisfaction with leisure, rather than other life domains, is the foremost determinant of life satisfaction or mental well-being. In other words, leisure plays a substantial role in an individual's life satisfaction and quality of life.

Family Leisure and Satisfaction

If leisure plays such an integral role in the life satisfaction and quality of life of an individual, it can be hypothesized that family leisure may also be a primary contributor to family satisfaction and quality of family life. Historically, researchers have reported, with little variation, significant positive relationships between participation in joint leisure activities and satisfaction with family life (Holman, 1981; Holman & Jacquart, 1988; Miller, 1976; Orthner, 1975; Smith, Snyder, & Monsma, 1988). Findings from international studies have also supported this relationship in subjects from Australia (Palisi, 1984), England (Bell, 1975), and Korea (Ahn, 1982). However, all of these studies focused on married couples and examined marital variables including joint couple leisure patterns and marital satisfaction. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.