Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

Children's Pain and Parents on the Front Line: Attitudinal Barriers and Cultural Aspects of Parental Pain Management

Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

Children's Pain and Parents on the Front Line: Attitudinal Barriers and Cultural Aspects of Parental Pain Management

Article excerpt

Children's pain is managed by many parents in the community using over-the-counter medications and prescribed mild analgesics often with little information provided about how they should be used. Previous research demonstrated parental lack of knowledge and negative attitudes regarding analgesia can result in the under-treatment of children's pain. The purpose of this study was to explore parental attitudinal barriers and how they differ between Israeli and American parents.

Methods: Three cross-sectional studies of Israeli (n=221) and American (n=132) parents of 0 to 14- year-old children in the community, the emergency department or undergoing elective surgery. Parents completed self-report instruments.

Results: Israeli parents demonstrated greater attitudinal barriers compared to American parents. Israeli parents more often suspected children report pain to gain attention (55% vs. 38%; p=0.02), were more likely to believe analgesia should only be taken for extreme pain (58% vs. 29%; pO.OOl), and were also more likely to believe children may become addicted to pain medication when taking it for pain (24% vs. …

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