Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

Providing Optimal Care to People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

Providing Optimal Care to People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Article excerpt

People with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (IDD) constitute 0.5-2% of Israel's population. When compared with the general population, Israelis with IDD experience health inequalities, lower life expectancy and higher level of health needs, which are often unrecognised and unmet. As a matter of basic human rights and according to the United Nations charter on human rights, people with IDD are entitled to the same health care that is available for the general population as a minimum. However, across the globe as in Israel, people with IDD:

* tend to have a higher level of morbidity and often multiple, complex and chronic health problems

* have higher prevalence of certain medical conditions (for example epilepsy) and also life style-related health risks like obesity and also low physical activity and fitness

* experience greater barriers to access health care (in surveys they are twice as likely to report unmet health care needs)

* are less likely to participate in community preventive medicine programs that the general population are offered

Different countries have developed various models for health care to the population of persons with intellectual disability. In Colorado, for example, the Developmental Disabilities Health Center (DDHC), offers multidisciplinary, fully integrated primary health care to children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. …

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