Academic journal article Northwestern University Law Review

Preface: How This Symposium Came About

Academic journal article Northwestern University Law Review

Preface: How This Symposium Came About

Article excerpt

This symposium originated during a lunch that included a group of Stanford Law School faculty members and two Hewlett Foundation staff members. The Hewlett Foundation had become increasingly interested in law schools' roles in conflict resolution and in legal problem solving more broadly. In 1999-when I was at Stanford Law School and before I had any foreseeable connection with the Foundation-I was among a group of faculty members who proposed an ambitious project related to legal problem solving. Our goal was to produce a set of materials that would make available to law teachers and their students a range of social science insights bearing on problem solving and decisionmaking by both private actors and public institutions. Steve Toben, who oversaw the Foundation's program in Conflict Resolution, and his associate Stephanie Smith met with us, and the Foundation made a grant.

The project began with an intensive workshop during the summer of 1999, in which faculty from various Stanford schools and departments interacted with a wonderful group of scholars from other universities.1 I think it is the result not (merely) of a selection bias, but of the particular intellectual atmosphere at Stanford in the 1990s, that many contributors to this symposium-including Chris Guthrie, Russell Korobkin, and Jeffrey Rachlinski, who were students then-have connections with Stanford. In addition to possessing an unusually heterodox group of economics-oriented faculty, the University was home to the Stanford Center on Conflict and Negotiation, an interdisciplinary venture among Economics, Psychology, Business, and Law, in which most of the symposium participants were involved at one or another time. Among the formidable scholars who inspired and led the Center2 was Amos Tversky. One really need not say more. Amos was an awesome intellect, an inspiring scholar, and a generous collaborator. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.