Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

All'indomani del Grande Scisma d'Occidente. Jean le Fèvre Canonista Al Servizio Dei Valois E Il Trattato

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

All'indomani del Grande Scisma d'Occidente. Jean le Fèvre Canonista Al Servizio Dei Valois E Il Trattato

Article excerpt

AWindomani del grande Scisma d'Occidente. Jean Le Fèvre canonista al servizio dei Valois e il trattato De planctu bonorum in risposta a Giovanni da Legnano. By Alessandro Fabbri. (Florence: Edifir Firenze Edizioni. 2013. Pp. 317. euro22,00 paperback. ISBN 978-88-7970-625-4.)

The Great Western Schism (1378-1417) began with disputed papal elections but soon erupted into pamphlet warfare. Urban VI (1378-1389), the Roman claimant, secured support from the jurists Baldus de Ubaldis and Giovanni da Legnano. An early reply on behalf of Clement VII (1378-94), the Avignon claimant, was written by Jean Le Fèvre, a Benedictine with training in canon law at the University of Paris. Le Fèvre became abbot of St. Vaast and entered the service of the French crown during the reign of Charles V (1364-80). His De planctu bonorum, completed in 1379, was specifically directed against the De fletu ecclesiae of the Bolognese professor Giovanni da Legnano. In this book, Alessandro Fabbri provides an overview of the origins of the Schism, the French response to the disputed papal election of 1378, and Le Fèvre's own career and his polemical work. An important part of this book is Fabbri's edition of his subject's tract.

Fabbri sketches the controversial conclave of 1378, the role of the French crown in ecclesiastical politics, and Le Fèvre's earlier life before settling into his study of the polemics about the papal election. An important part of this study is an outline of the differing casus, or summaries, on which the polemics were based. Giovanni da Legnano used summaries open to an Urbanist interpretation, whereas Le Fèvre used one favorable to Clement. It included an accusation that Bartolomeo Prignano, who became Urban VI, was involved in whipping up the Roman mob to demand choice of a pope from Rome or at least from Italy. …

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