Academic journal article European Journal of Psychotraumatology

The University of Queensland Study of Physical and Psychological Outcomes for Claimants with Minor and Moderate Injuries Following a Road Traffic Crash (UQ SuPPORT): Design and Methods

Academic journal article European Journal of Psychotraumatology

The University of Queensland Study of Physical and Psychological Outcomes for Claimants with Minor and Moderate Injuries Following a Road Traffic Crash (UQ SuPPORT): Design and Methods

Article excerpt

STUDY PROTOCOL

The University of Queensland study of physical and psychological outcomes for claimants with minor and moderate injuries following a road traffic crash (UQ SuPPORT): design and methods

Justin Kenardy1*, Michelle Heron-Delaney2, Nicholas Bellamy1, Michele Sterling1 and Luke Connelly1,3

1Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine (CONROD), School of Medicine, RBWH, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health, School of Economics, RBWH, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Abstract

Background : To date research investigating how mental health impacts physical recovery following a road traffic crash (RTC) has focused on cohorts with severe injuries. The UQ SuPPORT study aims to study the physical and psychological outcomes of claimants with minor injuries following an RTC under the Queensland common law compulsory insurance scheme.

Objectives : This paper outlines the protocols of this study as a platform for future publications.

Methods : The 2-year longitudinal cohort study collected interview and survey data from claimants at 6, 12, and 24 months post-RTC. Measures used in the telephone interview included the DSM-IV Composite International Diagnostic Interview for posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive episode, panic attacks, agoraphobia; and self-reported disability (WHO-DAS-II). Quality of life (SF-36v2), alcohol use (AUDIT), social support (MSPSS), quality-adjusted life years (EQ-5D), and return to work outcomes were assessed via postal questionnaires.

Results : A total of 382 claimants consented to participate at the beginning of the study, and these participants were approached at each wave. Retention was high (65%). The average age of participants at Wave 1 was 48.6 years, with 65% of the sample sustaining minor injuries (Injury Severity Score=1-3).

Conclusions : This study has collected a unique sample of data to investigate recovery patterns of claimants with minor injuries. Future publications will more fully assess the effects of the collected measures on recovery rates 2 years post-RTC.

Keywords: Posttraumatic stress; motor vehicle crash; longitudinal; physical recovery; minor injuries

*Correspondence to: Justin Kenardy, CONROD, Edith Cavell Building, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia, Email: j.kenardy@uq.edu.au

For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online

Received: 14 August 2013; Revised: 6 February 2014; Accepted: 1 March 2014; Published: 2 May 2014

European Journal of Psychotraumatology 2014. © 2014 Justin Kenardy et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC-BY 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, for any purpose, even commercially, under the condition that appropriate credit is given, that a link to the license is provided, and that you indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Citation: European Journal of Psychotraumatology 2014, 5 : 22612 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ejpt.v5.22612

Worldwide, up to 50 million people suffer a non-fatal injury from a road traffic crash (RTC) each year, leading to long-term disability in many individuals (World Health Organization, 2009). Over the past decade, there has been much research assessing both the physical and psychological consequences of RTCs. …

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