Academic journal article European Journal of Psychotraumatology

Adult Experience of Mental Health Outcomes as a Result of Intimate Partner Violence Victimisation: A Systematic Review

Academic journal article European Journal of Psychotraumatology

Adult Experience of Mental Health Outcomes as a Result of Intimate Partner Violence Victimisation: A Systematic Review

Article excerpt

INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND MENTAL HEALTH

Adult experience of mental health outcomes as a result of intimate partner violence victimisation: a systematic review

Susan Lagdon, Cherie Armour* and Maurice Stringer

School of Psychology, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland, UK

Abstract

Background : Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been known to adversely affect the mental health of victims. Research has tended to focus on the mental health impact of physical violence rather than considering other forms of violence.

Objective : To systematically review the literature in order to identify the impact of all types of IPV victimisation on various mental health outcomes.

Method : A systematic review of 11 electronic databases (2004-2014) was conducted. Fifty eight papers were identified and later described and reviewed in relation to the main objective.

Results : Main findings suggest that IPV can have increasing adverse effects on the mental health of victims in comparison with those who have never experienced IPV or those experiencing other traumatic events. The most significant outcomes were associations between IPV experiences with depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. Findings confirm previous observations that the severity and extent of IPV exposure can increase mental health symptoms. The effect of psychological violence on mental health is more prominent than originally thought. Individual differences such as gender and childhood experience of violence also increase IPV risk and affect mental health outcomes in diverse ways.

Conclusions : Psychological violence should be considered as a more serious form of IPV which can affect the mental health of victims. Experiencing more than one form of IPV can increase severity of outcomes. Researchers should look at IPV as a multi-dimensional experience. A uniformed definition and measure of IPV could help advance knowledge and understanding of this disparaging global issue.

Keywords: Intimate partner violence; domestic violence; PTSD; depression; gender; mental health

Responsible Editor: Sheila Sprague, McMaster University, Canada.

*Correspondence to: Cherie Armour, School of Psychology, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland, UK, Email: armour.cherie@gmail.com

For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online

This paper is part of the Special Issue: Intimate partner violence and mental health . More papers from this issue can be found at http://www.eurojnlofpsychotraumatol.net

Received: 29 April 2014; Revised: 10 July 2014; Accepted: 14 July 2014; Published: 12 September 2014

European Journal of Psychotraumatology 2014. © 2014 Susan Lagdon et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, for any purpose, even commercially, under the condition that appropriate credit is given, that a link to the license is provided, and that you indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Citation: European Journal of Psychotraumatology 2014, 5 : 24794 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ejpt.v5.24794

Intimate partner violence (IPV) has become a global issue of concern which negatively affects individuals beyond the immediate harm incurred through physical injury (Giridhar, 2012). Historically, terms such as wife battering, wife abuse, domestic violence, and family violence have been used to describe this occurrence (Van Parys, Verhamme, Temmerman, & Verstraelen, 2014). …

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