Academic journal article Journal of Healthcare Management

Editorial

Academic journal article Journal of Healthcare Management

Editorial

Article excerpt

Sadly, after five years, this issue of JHM concludes my tenure as editor. Bita A. Kash, PhD, FACHE, associate professor at Texas A&M University whose research, teaching, and experience applying rigorous science to the understanding and improvement of healthcare management practice are known throughout the country, will be assuming this role. I am indebted to ACHE, the JHM editorial board, and our exceptionally talented managing editor and staff at Health Administration Press who have been so supportive of me and the journal. They define professionalism and have allowed me to learn so much. From the prominent healthcare leaders I have been privileged to interview to our column and research article authors, Practitioner Application writers, manuscript reviewers, and the remarkable faculty and students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, I am grateful for your willing contribu-tions of time, expertise, insight, and support to allow the journal to become the best outlet it can be. I am, however, most appreciative of our readers, as it is for you that the journal exists and continues to be a source of dialogue, evidence, and inspiration for our field.

Our interview is with Ninfa M. Saunders, DHA, RN, FACHE, president and CEO of Navicent Health. Dr. Saunders discusses the behavioral competencies a CEO should possess in today's healthcare environment, her philosophy for building better governing boards, her secret for having a positive reputation among physicians, and the impetus for and rationale behind the creation of Stratus Healthcare.

Our Careers columnist for this issue, Michael A. Broscio, of ACHE's Career Resource Center, investigates the proportion of healthcare executives with a career plan, the particular challenges encountered at different career stages, and the extent to which career assistance resources are utilized by these executives. Understanding the challenges associated with specific career stages can enhance career development and guidance.

Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) offers healthcare providers an approach to lowering costs and improving outcomes (i.e., enhancing value). However, as a new costing technique, it has not been systematically implemented and evaluated. Robert S. Kaplan, PhD, et al. describe TDABC at several leading healthcare organizations in the United States and Europe. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.