Academic journal article The George Washington International Law Review

Global Justice and International Economic Law: Three Takes

Academic journal article The George Washington International Law Review

Global Justice and International Economic Law: Three Takes

Article excerpt

Global Justice and International Economic Law: Three Takes, by Frank J. Garcia. New York, New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2013. Pp. 350. $89.00 (hardcover).

In Global Justice and International Economic Law: Three Takes, Frank Garcia examines global justice in the context of growing interna- tional interdependency and globalization. "Global justice," as Gar- cia uses the term, embodies the various justifications behind state actions. Garcia surveys "three takes" on global justice, expanding upon the theoretical work of earlier writers such as John Rawls and Thomas Nagel. The resulting book is a well-researched and reada- ble academic work that should interest experts and laypersons alike.

Garcia has written extensively on matters of global justice, and here he ties together a number of ideas and strains of thought from previous works. The book offers a summary, and in some cases an in-depth exploration, of many of Garcia's ideas. However, readers should bear in mind that the book follows the grand, theo- retical tradition of philosophers rather than natural scientists. For instance, Garcia engages in only cursory case studies in each sec- tion to demonstrate the application of his three takes on global justice, and he does not lay out much-if any-hard data to sup- port or rebut his arguments. Instead, Global Justice and International Economic Law lays a framework for future exploration and analysis and serves as a powerful introduction to its subject matter.

To use Garcia's own words, he wrote this book to "examine the different ways in which we conceptualize the problem of global jus- tice and its relationship to trade law, and to economic law and eco- nomic fairness more generally, in view of globalization and the diversity of normative traditions which it highlights." To break this down, "global justice" is a catch-all term for how and why countries justify their interactions with other countries. "Globalization and the diversity of normative traditions it highlights" refers, in its sim- plest sense, to the problem of one country justifying its actions with a principle of justice that an affected country rejects as illegitimate. For instance, a Western country may refuse to trade with a particu- lar nation that uses child labor because of its Western legal stan- dards. The affected nation likely will not condemn child labor, and consequently will view the Western country's action as unfair. …

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