Academic journal article Change Over Time

Foreword: The Venice Charter at Fifty

Academic journal article Change Over Time

Foreword: The Venice Charter at Fifty

Article excerpt

2014 marks thß fiftieth anniversary of the Second International Congress of Architects and Technicians of Historic Monuments and the adoption of the International Charter for the Conservation and Restoration of Monuments and Sites, known today as the Venice Charter. Thirty-three years earlier, the First International Congress met in 1931 in Athens to rescue the field of heritage conservation from the inherited polarities of nineteenthcentury restoration and preservation to a mediated view of the past as series of discreet histories, distinct from the present. It was, however, in 1964 at the Second Congress that the concept of universal heritage was further refined as the totality of unique expressions within each country's own cultural traditions. Such complexities were no doubt amplified in response to the wholesale destruction in postwar Europe and the increasing expansion of heritage classifications.

Today, contemporary conservation still holds to the principles of the Venice Charter, while also arguing that value and significance are culturally determined, a point clearly stated in the preamble of the original Venice Charter. In recent decades a number of principles and assumptions in the Venice Charter have been challenged as our definitions of cultural heritage have changed and our relationship to that heritage has evolved. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.