Academic journal article Academy of Marketing Studies Journal

Developing a Multi-Item Measurement Scale for Developing Country Teenagers' Consumtion Related Values through Involvement in Reality Television

Academic journal article Academy of Marketing Studies Journal

Developing a Multi-Item Measurement Scale for Developing Country Teenagers' Consumtion Related Values through Involvement in Reality Television

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

Teenagers worldwide are an emerging market segment that is receiving increasing attention from researchers (Bhosale & Gupta 2006; Lueg & Finney 2007). Specifically, as a consumer socialisation agent; electronic media receives maximum attention (Dotson & Hyatt 2005; Vakratsas & Ambler 1999). Consumption related values, on the other hand, are often identified as one of the common outcome components of the consumer socialisation process (Chan 2003; Gruber & Thau 2003). Reality Television (RTV) is a contemporary electronic media vehicle. RTV has generated a lot of interest among teenagers because of its interesting content (Lundy & Jacobson 2008). Furthermore, the nature of participants (Jacobs 2008), format (James 2007), and reward system (Driscoll 2007), makes RTV different and exclusive from other TV programs. Understanding the role of RTV in the development of consumption related values of teenagers in a developing country is critical for further theory building in the field. It is particularly important due to the huge size of the teenaged market segment and impressive growth of electronic media in developing countries (Quraishi, Bhuiya & Mohammad 2004). Further, theory building in this area is also important in developing countries, where the population is relatively young. Accordingly, the key problem this research will address is:

How to measure developing country teenagers ' consumption related values development by RTV?

CONSUMPTION RELATED VALUES

Consumption related values are considered as one of the common outcome components of the consumer socialisation process (Chan 2003; Gruber & Thau 2003). According to Pope, Brenan and Voges (2007, p. 335) "Values are shared beliefs among group members as to what behaviours are desirable or undesirable". Furthermore, Schiffinan et al. (2005, p. 637) defined values as "relatively enduring beliefs that serve as guides for what is considered 'appropriate' behaviour and are widely accepted by the members of the society". So, consumption related values can be conceptualised as shared beliefs among group members as to what behaviours are desirable or undesirable toward products, prohibited product consumption, materialism and antisocial behaviour. (Chan 2003; Ghani 2005; Gruber & Thau 2003; Wyllie, Zhang & Casswell 1998). Generally, teenagers' values are significantly affected by electronic media, particularly Television (TV) (Bushman 2005; Gruber & Thau 2003). These days, teenagers are highly involved with the different content of TV and various TV vehicles (Acevedo-Polakovich et al. 2005; Choi & Ferle 2004). Teenagers' values development through TV has been explored from a social perceptive as well as from the context of consumer socialisation (Gruber & Thau 2003; Ward & Rivadeneyra 1999).

Theoretically, values development as an outcome of teenagers' socialisation process by the media is mainly explained from the perspectives of cultivation theory, observational learning theory and displacement theory. Cultivation theory suggests that frequent TV viewing increases the likelihood of the development of consumption related values that ultimately alters viewers' behaviour (Gruber & Thau 2003). Cultivation theory mainly suggests that teenagers' learning from TV is strongly associated with the volume of their watching and involvement with TV (Gruber & Thau 2003). Furthermore, values development of the consumer through the media also has been discussed by social learning theory, particularly by observational learning theory (Gruber & Thau 2003). Observational learning theory posits that people learn from observing others' behaviour and practice accordingly if rewarded and reinforced (Bandura 1977; Ward & Rivadeneyra 1999). In particular, teenaged children through observation or by imitating their favourite characters from TV develop their consumption related values that influence their consumption related behaviour (Bushman 2005; Russell, Norman & Heckler 2004). …

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