Academic journal article International Journal of Education

The Effect of Using Smart Board on Mathematics Achievement and Retention of Seventh Grade Students

Academic journal article International Journal of Education

The Effect of Using Smart Board on Mathematics Achievement and Retention of Seventh Grade Students

Article excerpt

Abstract

The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of using smart board on mathematics achievement and retention of seventh grade students. To achieve this purpose a study sample of (103) students was selected from the seventh grade. This sample was divided into two groups. One group was randomly chosen to be the experimental group that studied mathematics using smart board; the other was the control group that studied mathematics using traditional method and board. The instrument of the study was an achievement test which was used to measure mathematics achievement and retention of the students. Data analysis procedures using T-test for independent samples revealed a positive effect of using smart board on students' achievement and retention in mathematics.

Keywords: Smart board, mathematics achievement, mathematics retention.

1. Introduction

Technology has become an essential tool for doing mathematics in today's world. It can be used in a variety of ways to improve and enhance the learning of mathematics. As NCTM (2000) highlights in its standards, technology can facilitate mathematical problem solving, communication, reasoning, and proof; moreover, technology can provide students with opportunities to explore different representations of mathematical ideas and support them in making connections both within and outside of mathematics (Niess,2006). The research literature provides supporting evidence that the use of technology has enabled students to visualize mathematics, engage in active learning strategies, verify conjectures, have positive attitudes, and build confidence in their ability to do mathematics (Kersaint, 2007).

This call to integrate technology into mathematics education challenges not only school mathematics, but also preservice and in-service mathematics education of teachers. Mathematics teacher educators are challenged with the task of preparing teachers who can utilize technology as an essential tool in developing a deep understanding of mathematics for themselves and for their students. Recent trends in teacher education have emphasized the importance of learning with technology rather than learning about technology (Li, 2003).

Teacher preparation programs need to focus on strengthening the preservice teachers' knowledge of how to incorporate technology to facilitate student learning of mathematics through experiences that (Niess, 2006):

- Allow teacher candidates to explore and learn mathematics using technology in ways that build confidence and understanding of the technology and mathematics.

- Model appropriate uses of a variety of established and new applications of technology as tools to develop a deep understanding of mathematics in varied contexts.

- Help teacher candidates make informed decisions about appropriate and effective uses of technology in the teaching and learning of mathematics.

- Provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and practice teaching lessons that take advantage of the ability of technology to enrich and enhance the learning of mathematics.

One of the new technological advancements that is widely used in the classroom nowadays is a smart board to increase a student's knowledge and motivation (Rakes et ah, 2006; Siemens and Matheos, 2010; Knezek et al., 2006). The technological capabilities of the smart board and its attendant software are highly compelling to students, effectively drawing them into the content of the lesson. Investment of financial and human resources in smart board technology is seen as warranted in part because it promises to make learning more engaging for students, especially in technical subjects (e.g., mathematics) in which teachers sometimes struggle in their efforts to help students engage and achieve (Torff & Tirotta, 2010).

Interactive smart boards have gained a reputation in the educational system from the first grade to the university stage (Bell, 2002; Oigara, 2010). …

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