Academic journal article English Language Teaching

Research Article Abstracts in Two Subdisciplines of Business-Move Structure and Hedging between Management and Marketing

Academic journal article English Language Teaching

Research Article Abstracts in Two Subdisciplines of Business-Move Structure and Hedging between Management and Marketing

Article excerpt

Abstract

The importance of RA abstracts lies in their influence on the readers' decision about whether the accompanying article is worth reading. A number of studies have investigated the move structure of abstracts and have generated several influential models. However, little research has been conducted on subdisciplinary variations in move structure of abstracts. Additionally, previous studies have investigated independently either the move structure or the hedging use of academic writings. The attempt of the integration of the both have been lacking yet. Therefore, this study reports the analysis of move structure and hedging use in Management and Marketing abstracts. Comparative analysis was also conducted to investigate sudisciplinary variations in both move structure and hedging use between the two subdisciplines in the field of Business. In total, sixty-fom research articles abstracts published in 2012 were randomly selected form eight leading journals in two subdisciplines. Hyland's model (2000) was adopted as analytical framework for move structure analysis, and Wordsmith Tool was used to search hedging in the corpus. Results showed that the move structure of I-P-Pr (Introduction-Purpose-Product) is the most dominant sequences in both Management and Marketing. Regarding the use of hedging, all the five types occurred in both subdisciplines of Business. The findings of this study have also demonstrated the existence of variations in terms of both move structure and the use of hedging in the abstracts between the two subdisciplines. Therefore, pedagogical implications can be proposed that teaching practices should address the variations so as to meet the specific expectations from different particular discourse communities.

Keywords: business RA, abstracts, move structure, hedging, subdisciplinary variations

1. Introduction

RA abstracts have become a separate, well-established gerne in academic discourse since the discourse community of scholars has asked for RA abstracts as orienting tools for their reading (Gillaerts & Velde, 2010). An abstract is sometimes called 'a summary' because it presents a faithful and accurate summary, which is representative of the whole article ((Bhatia, 1993), and it attempts to summarize the main features and findings of the accompanying article (Bonn & Swales, 2007). The Abstract is important because it influences the readers' decision about whether the accompanying article is worth reading. Swales (1990) proposes that Abstract is an advance indicator of the content and structure and a representation of an article. Despite sharing some common features of the RA, the Abstract constitutes a gerne in its own right and it differs in its rhetorical structure (Lords, 2004).

A number of studies have investigated the move structure of the Abstract. The influential research includes Bhatia (1993), Santos (1996), Hyland (2000), Martin (2003), Lords (2004), and Samraj (2005). All these studies took Swales' CARS model (1990) as starting point and focused on the rhetorical components or 'moves' of abstracts in different settings.

Bhatia (1993) identifies a four-move framework for a typical abstract consisting of Introducing purpose, Describing methodology, Summarizing results, and Presenting conclusions. These four moves are correspondent with the information an abstract contains. Bhatia's (1993) four-move pattern structure is reported to be common structure in the Abstracts in Martin (2003) who identified four basic elements of I (Introduction)- M (Methodology)- R (Results)- C (Conclusions). However, Santos (1996) proposes a five-move models for the abstract after analyzing 94 abstracts in Applied Linguistics, which is slightly different from that in Bhatia (1993) and Martin (2003). The IMRC pattern identified in Bhatia (1993) can be found in the last four moves in Santos' (1996) model which contains five moves and a number of submoves. The last four moves in Santos (1996) indicate the purpose, describe the methodology, summarize the results and discuss the research, respectively. …

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