Academic journal article Childhood Obesity

The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Project: A Team Approach for Supporting a Multisite, Multisector Intervention

Academic journal article Childhood Obesity

The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Project: A Team Approach for Supporting a Multisite, Multisector Intervention

Article excerpt

[Author Affiliation]

Nancy Williams. 1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. 2 United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, Atlanta, GA.

Carrie A. Dooyema. 1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Jennifer L. Foltz. 1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. 2 United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, Atlanta, GA.

Brook Belay. 1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Heidi M. Blanck. 1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. 2 United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, Atlanta, GA.

Address correspondence to: Nancy Williams, MSPH, Project Officer, Obesity Prevention and Control Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease, Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, F77, Atlanta, GA 30341, E-mail: ndw6@cdc.gov

Introduction

The prevention and reduction of childhood obesity is a public health priority. Results from the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, using measured heights and weights, indicate that an estimated 16.9% of children and adolescents 2-19 years of age are obese with higher rates among some subgroups, such as non-Hispanic black and Hispanic children.1

Because children with lower socioeconomic status may be at increased risk for obesity owing to a number of factors,2 there is a need to address childhood obesity in high-risk populations to improve health and reduce disparities. The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) specifically enrolls children who have been identified based on family income. CHIP also enrolls many minority children and adolescents who are disproportionately burdened by obesity.3 Thus, obesity prevention efforts targeting the CHIP population have the potential to decrease obesity in an underserved population, as well as possibly reducing costs of related comorbidities.

The Institute of Medicine put forth a framework of the socioecological model (SEM) to address obesity that details the reciprocal relationship between individuals and their environments.4 This model has been adopted and has led to interventions that utilize multisetting, multilevel (MSML) approaches to support both children and their families and promote supportive environments in settings where children spend time, such as schools and child care centers.5 By connecting and reinforcing interventions in public health, healthcare, and the community at large, MSML approaches have the potential to assist all children and families in communities by addressing obesity through both prevention and treatment approaches in key settings.6-8 This MSML approach is supported by the SEM,6 which identifies the relationship between individuals and their environment, including settings such as healthcare, schools, early care and education, and the community at large. As such, the SEM recognizes that individuals are influenced by relationships with others as well as other effectors of behavior, such as system-level effects and public policy factors. …

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