Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Egidio Da Viterbo: Cardinale Agostiniano Tra Roma E l'Europa del Rinascimento: Atti del Convegno, Viterbo, 22-23 Settembre 2012-Roma, 26-28 Settembre 2012

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Egidio Da Viterbo: Cardinale Agostiniano Tra Roma E l'Europa del Rinascimento: Atti del Convegno, Viterbo, 22-23 Settembre 2012-Roma, 26-28 Settembre 2012

Article excerpt

Egidio da Viterbo: Cardinale Agostiniano tra Roma e l'Europa dcl Rinascimento: Attr del Convegno, Viterbo, 22-23 settembre 2012-Roma, 26-28 settembre 2012. Edited by Myriam Chiabo, Rocco Ronzani, and Angelo Maria Vitale. (Rome: Centro Cultúrale Agostiniano Roma nel Rinascimento. 2014. Pp. xv, 484. euro50,00 paperback. ISBN 978-88-85913-83-7.)

Egidio da Viterbo, or Giles of Viterbo (d. 1527), was an Augustinian friar- eventually Prior General of his order, a theologian, reformer, and cardinal. His intellectual interests included not just theology but mythology and the Cabala. In the English-speaking world, Giles is best known for his 1507 oration before Pope Julius II, expressing hope that a new age was dawning. He also gave the opening oration in 1512 at the Fifth Lateran Council, which attempted to reform the Church. This collection, based on a 2012 conference, addresses these and other aspects of Giles's life and thought.

The papers fall into rough thematic groups. Some are quite brief, but others are very substantive. Following an overview of Italy and Europe in Giles's time (Laura Ronchi De Michelis), the first group (Anna Esposito, Mario Mattei, Luciano Osbat, Mauro Papalini, and Jurai Batelja) targets Viterbo and Giles's life in the order, including his love of solitude, as well as the role of the order in Croatia, then falling under Turkish rule. This group is somewhat miscellaneous, but it makes use of Giles's surviving correspondence.

The second group (Gennaro Savarese, Daniel Nodes, Daniela Ciammetti, and John Monfasani) is more coherent, focusing on Giles's commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard ad mentem Platonis. The Augustinian composed this extensive work using both Christian and non-Christian sources, employing classical and mythological motifs. This was true even in the Augustinian's exposition of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit (Nodes). This was true, too, of Giles's writing on divine transcendence (Ciammetti) and his critique of Aristotle (Monfasani). …

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