Academic journal article Management Dynamics

The Impact of Cross-Channel Cognitive Evaluations on the Continued Use Intentions of Mobile Banking

Academic journal article Management Dynamics

The Impact of Cross-Channel Cognitive Evaluations on the Continued Use Intentions of Mobile Banking

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT

Although most banks offer their clients multi-channel service delivery options, very little is known about mobile banking usage in a multi-channel service context. It is believed that in a concurrent channel usage context, bank clients' beliefs about internet banking can influence their continued use intentions of mobile banking; so this study investigates the influence of cross-channel cognitive evaluations from the internet banking channel on the formation of the continued use intentions of mobile banking. Data were collected from 487 concurrent users of internet and mobile banking. The results of the study revealed that cross-channel evaluative synergies and dissynergies do indeed impact salient beliefs influencing the continued use intentions of mobile banking. The results suggest that the convenience and time-saving benefits that concurrent users experience when using internet banking strongly impact on their mobile banking usefulness perceptions. On the other hand, mobile banking trust, risk and self-efficacy beliefs may be more pertinent in the continued use of mobile banking.

INTRODUCTION

Information technology (IT) has fundamentally reshaped many industries, including the banking industry. In the banking industry new developments in IT provide opportunities for banks to support and enhance relationships with their customers by means of the cross-selling of customised products and innovative services, and by making the business process flexible and customer-driven (Marine, 2013). Recently, the convergence of the internet, wireless technologies, and mobile devices has enabled mobile commerce (m-commerce) - a new paradigm of an emerging IT artefact (Luo, Li, Zhang and Shim, 2010). M-commerce refers to activities related to commercial transactions that are conducted via wireless and mobile communication networks that use wireless and mobile devices as the user interface (Benou and Vassilakis, 2010). In the financial industry, banks have seized the m-commerce opportunity to develop innovative services, and have introduced mobile banking services as an additional channel to traditional banking channels and other electronic banking channels. However, the success of information technology often depends more on continued usage than on initial adoption (Son and Han, 2011; Bhattacheijee, 2001a). Thus, information systems continuance of use at the individual level is central to the success of many e-commerce models (Lu, Wang, Yu and Wu, 2009).

To date, the continuance of use of mobile banking has not received the same attention in scholarly research as has the continued use of internet banking. Our search for empirical studies on mobile banking continuance of use yielded only two results. The study of Suoranta and Mattila (2004) is limited to descriptive results regarding the continued use intention of regular users of mobile banking according to age categories and household income category. The second study, Lin (2011), the influence of attitude towards using mobile banking on the continued use of mobile banking was reported. The results of the study indicate that attitude towards using mobile banking does influence the continued use of mobile banking.

M-commerce is a natural extension of electronic commerce (e-commerce) (Ozok and Wei, 2010), and therefore the customer value offered by both e-commerce and m-commerce is complementary (Kuo and Chen, 2006). Internet and mobile banking belong to the same category of banking services: electronic banking (Angelakopoulos andMihiotis, 2011). Moreover, internet banking and mobile banking are concurrent channels, because internet banking and mobile banking offer similar benefits and services to bank clients.

Although mobile banking presents enhanced 'anywhere, anytime' banking for bank clients, globally internet banking is still the preferred way to access account information and to do basic banking transactions (Ernst and Young, 2012). Bank clients' continued preference for internet banking can be explained by the view that mobile banking is not yet perceived as a trusted channel for banking transactions (Emst and Young, 2012). …

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