Academic journal article Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri

The Effect of Gender, Seniority and Subject Matter on the Perceptions of Organizational Justice of Teachers: A Meta-Analytical Study

Academic journal article Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri

The Effect of Gender, Seniority and Subject Matter on the Perceptions of Organizational Justice of Teachers: A Meta-Analytical Study

Article excerpt

There is a significant increase in the number of research studies about organizational behavior in the area of educational administration. This increase is also due to the emergence of human-centered management theories within the framework of approaching human relations. These humancentered theories emphasize sensitivity to certain employee characteristics such as emotions, ideas, values, culture and needs (Yilmaz & Altinkurt, 2012a). In this regard, it can be seen that concepts like organizational justice, citizenship, trust, commitment, culture, values and emotions, aside from many others, are covered in research studies. Among such concepts, organizational justice attracts attention as one of the most important subjects in the literature on organizational behavior.

Adams' Equality Theory (1963) serves as the basis for studies on organizational justice. Research studies conducted over time have contributed to the development of the concept of organizational justice. A meta-analytical study published by Cohen-Charash and Spector in 2001 encompassed approximately 400 empirical and 200 theoretical studies published in the area of organizational justice. Among these, the number of studies conducted on educational institutions was relatively less. This number has increased, however, owing to measurement tools developed specifically for educational institutions (Donovan, Drasgow, & Munson, 1998; Hoy & Tarter, 2004; Niehoff & Moorman, 1993). In parallel, there has been a significant increase in the number of studies on organizational justice in the area of educational administration in Turkey since 2000.

One reason for the interest of researchers with organizational justice could be the relationship of organizational justice to several variables. The literature shows that organizational justice is related to such variables as job satisfaction (Clay-Warner, Reynolds, & Roman, 2005; Elma, 2013; Karaköse, Altinkurt, & Yilmaz, 2009; Yürür, 2008), organizational citizenship behavior (Farh, Earley, & Lin, 1997; Moorman, 1991; Niehoff & Moorman, 1993; Polat, 2007; Tansky, 1993; Yilmaz & Altinkurt, 2012b), organizational trust (Folger & Konovsky, 1989; Lind & Tyler, 1988; Özgan, 2011; Polat & Celep, 2008; Yilmaz & Altinkurt, 2012b), motivation (Folger & Cronpanzano, 1998; Lambert, 2003; Sökmen, Bilsel, & Erbil, 2013), burnout (Liljegren & Ekberg, 2009; Moliner, Martinez-Tur, Peiro, & Ramos, 2005), organizational commitment (Babaoglan & Ertürk, 2013; Folger & Konovsky, 1989; Lind & Tyler, 1988; Moorman, Niehoff, & Organ, 1993; Özgan, 2011), and job performance (Conlon, Meyer, & Nowakowski, 2005; Walumbwa, Cropanzano, & Hartnell, 2009). The meta-analytical study conducted by Colquitt, Conlon, Wesson, Porter, and Ng (2001) revealed a relationship between the sub-dimensions of organizational justice and job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, end of employment, performance, and assessment of authority. The perception of justice of employees is sometimes the cause of the aforementioned, whereas in other cases it is a result of them. Therefore, it can be stated that the perception of organizational justice is one of the classical subjects which attract the attention of literature on management.

The concept of organizational justice is related to the perception of employees regarding justice inside an organization (Eskew, 1993; Moorman, 1991). Employees set certain criteria when establishing this perception, and use these to determine whether they are treated fairly or not (Altinkurt & Yilmaz, 2010). The belief of employees in the justice and fairness of practices in an organization is one of the reasons that motivates them and supports their efforts (Töremen & Tan, 2010). Nonetheless, since justice is a relative subject it is almost impossible to establish a fully objective set of criteria for what is fair and what is not (Altinkurt, 2010). …

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