Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology

Pointing towards Visuospatial Patterns in Short-Term Memory: Differential Effects on Familiarity- and Recollection-Based Judgments

Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology

Pointing towards Visuospatial Patterns in Short-Term Memory: Differential Effects on Familiarity- and Recollection-Based Judgments

Article excerpt

Previous studies have indicated that pointing toward to-be-remembered visuospatial patterns enhances short-term memory (STM) when the presentation of pointing and no-pointing trials is mixed (Chum et al., 2007; Dodd & Shumborski, 2009; Rossi-Arnaud et al., 2012). By contrast, when presentation is blocked, pointing has inhibitory effects on memory (Dodd & Shumborski, 2009; Rossi-Arnaud et al., 2012). In the present study, we demonstrated that pointing has different effects on short-term recollection- and familiarity-based judgments, depending on the length of the visuospatial patterns (5- vs. 7-item arrays) and the interval between the encoding and test phases (2 vs. 5 s). More specifically, pointing decreased the accuracy of recollection-based judgments for 5-item arrays, but not for 7-item arrays (this negative effect did not interact with interval length). In contrast, pointing facilitated familiarity-based judgments when the interval between the study and test phases was 5 s, but not when it was 2 s (this positive effect did not interact with pattern length). We proposed that the negative effects might be accounted for by the simultaneous recruitment of attention resources in the planning and execution of pointing movements. As a consequence, executive resources are diverted from the primary memory task, resulting in a less efficient use of attention-demanding retrieval strategies, like chunking. By contrast, the positive effects on familiarity judgments might reflect the unitization of the to-be-remembered items into a single shape.

Keywords: pointing, movement, STM, recollection, familiarity

Résumé

Des études antérieures ont révélé que pointer vers les schémas visuo-spatiaux à se rappeler améliore la mémoire à court terme dans le cadre d'essais avec et sans pointage (Chum et al., 2007; Dodd & Shumborski, 2009; Rossi-Arnaud et al., 2012). Au contraire, lorsque la présentation est cachée, pointer a un effet inhibiteur sur la mémoire (Dodd & Shumborski, 2009; Rossi-Arnaud et al., 2012) Dans la présente étude, il est montré que pointer a des effets différents sur le rappel à court terme et les jugements fondés sur la familiarité, selon la longueur des schémas visuo-spatiaux (séries de 5 vs 7 items) et l'intervalle entre les phases d'encodage et de tests (2 vs 5 sec.). Plus précisément, pointer a diminué la précision des jugements basés sur la remémoration pour les séries de 5 items, mais non pour celles de 7 items (cet effet négatif n'était pas relié à la durée de l'intervalle). En revanche, pointer a facilité les jugements fondés sur la familiarité lorsque l'intervalle entre l'étude et les phases de test était de 5 sec, mais non de 2 sec (cet effet positif n'était pas relié à la longueur du schéma). Il est proposé que les effets négatifs pourraient être attribuables à la sollicitation simultanée des ressources d'attention dans la planification et l'exécution des mouvements de pointage. Par conséquent, les ressources exécutives sont détournées de la principale tâche de mémorisation, ce qui donne lieu à une utilisation moins efficace des stratégies de récupération exigeant de l'attention, comme le regroupement. Au contraire, les effets positifs sur les jugements fondés sur la familiarité peuvent témoigner de l'unitisation des items à mémoriser en une seule entité.

Mots-clés : pointer, mouvement, mémoire à court terme, remémorer, familiarité.

An impressive number of studies have lent support to the conclusion that the introduction of movement-based secondary tasks, such as tapping the keys of a keypad in a predetermined order, during the encoding and retention phases of a spatial memory task significantly reduces recall accuracy (see Quinn, 2008 for a review). These findings have typically been interpreted in the context of the Logie's model of visuospatial working memory (Logie, 1995), which includes a passive store (the visual cache), responsible for the storage of visual information, and an active rehearsal mechanism (the inner scribe), responsible for coding and rehearsing spatial stimuli in terms of movements (see Darling, Della Sala, & Logie, 2009; Logie & Pearson, 1997, and Pickering, Gathercole, Hall, & Lloyd, 2001 for behavioural evidence). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.