Academic journal article North Korean Review

Editors' Comments

Academic journal article North Korean Review

Editors' Comments

Article excerpt

In August 2013, I was tasked with the responsibilities of managing editor of the North Korean Review. Admittedly, at first this was a daunting task but under the careful guidance of founding editor Sukhi Kim and editor Yongho Kim, the job has been easier than I first feared. Of course, during this transitional period there were many challenges but these too were mitigated by the hard working staff of McFarland, Layla Milholen in particular. This fall 2014 issue of the North Korean Review marks the end of the first year of my work on this journal, and I am very happy to say that the authors of this issue have prepared some interesting research for our readers.

Hwang, Oh and Kim examine whether economic integration between South and North Korea has promoted political cooperation and whether external forces are still a dominant factor in explaining their behavior. To this end the authors perform an empirical analysis of the two nations' voting behavior in the UNGA with interesting conclusions.

Halbertsma shows that Mongolia's unique relationship with and access to the DPRK's leadership has primarily proven to be a most valuable asset in boosting Mongolia's profile in the region and the world at large. Whether Mongolia can "spearhead a regional security mechanism," as suggested by both Mongolian politicians and international analysts, remains to be seen.

Hong, Lee and Park discuss how international cooperation and structural changes in the northeast Asian logistics market can effect economic and political change in North Korea. Their findings are optimistic that international cooperation and structural changes in the northern logistics network system will foster economic growth, reform, and opening-up in North Korea, with the prospect of economic prosperity and political stability in the northeast Asian region.

Yang, Han and Ren demonstrate that despite the tension between North Korea and South Korea, tourists from China and other countries are visiting North Korea at an increasing rate. …

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