Academic journal article Journal of Information Ethics

Neuroethics

Academic journal article Journal of Information Ethics

Neuroethics

Article excerpt

We know. And what we know has value. Thus, others may act mistakenly, connivingly, dishonestly, or egregiously to discover our secrets. Legal mandates and ethical constraint often help to control less socially acceptable methods such as torture. But now we have discovered new ways of ferreting out information: We can, to a limited extent, directly access a person's brain and learn things that he or she may wish to conceal, things that could help avert a tragedy or save lives, but information that has traditionally been protected because we did not have access to PET scans, EEGs or MRIs. Now we can take an image of the brain and attempt to discover the truth. Brain patterns do correlate with specific social manifestations including neurosis, racial attitude, and deception. And brain scans have already been presented as evidence in court cases. Our technological expertise will continue to expand until we can actually read the brain. Our current armamentarium also includes cognitive performance enhancing drugs that alter, control, or enhance the brain's functioning. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.