Academic journal article International Journal of Linguistics

The Perceptions of Saudi EFL English-Major Students of the Impact of Video Materials on the Improvement the Listening Skill

Academic journal article International Journal of Linguistics

The Perceptions of Saudi EFL English-Major Students of the Impact of Video Materials on the Improvement the Listening Skill

Article excerpt

Abstract

The study attempted to explore the EFL Saudi university students' perceptions of the impact of video material on their listening skill. More specifically, the study attempts to answer the following primary question; "To what extent do Saudi EFL students perceive that video integration in listening classrooms is effective on their listening comprehension level?" The sample of the study consisted of 18 male students majoring in English, between 18-20 years old, enrolling in English 044 course for the listening and speaking skills during the first semester of 2014. They were studying at the English Department of College of Languages and Translation at Al-Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh-Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The instruments of the study included a close-ended questionnaire, and open-end question in which the respondents were asked to write a short paragraph expressing their preferences to either video utilization or audio usage. The SPSS program was used for data analysis of the close-ended questionnaire, namely T-test, Percentages, Means and Standard Deviations were calculated to analyze the study participants' responses to the questionnaire items. Quantitative analysis was also used to interpret the study participants' responses to the open-ended question. The results of the study indicated that there were statistically significant differences in the subjects' perceptions of videos and audios integration in the listening skill in favor of videos utilization. The quantitative analysis revealed that students were more interested in learning to listen with videos rather than learning with audios. Recommendations were stated for researchers, teachers of English, stakeholders, and educational institutions in Saudi Arabia.

Keywords: Listening skill, Attitudes, Perceptions, EFL Saudi students, Language skills

1. Introduction

The study tries to explore the EFL Saudi University students' perceptions of the impact of video material on their listening skill compared to audios integration. The target groups of the current study are students in the College of Languages and Translation at Al-Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University. They are currently students at the preparatory year program, level 2, of the intensive course of English 044 which intends to improve their English skills including listening. Video material was injected for the first time to this group of students since the preparatory year program has started four years ago. In the past, students were introduced only to audio materials for the listening skill classes. For this reason, the study will investigate the English 044 students' perceptions of video material compared to audio material. The textbook used by this group has both audio and video materials.

The researcher has noticed that video content can enhance students listening skills in different ways. For example, the settings, actions and gestures provided by video clips constitute visual stimulus for the Saudi EFL learners to interact in a more constructive manners with the listening material. Using technologies, in general, and videos specifically, can provide EFL learners with ample opportunities to learn the listening skill in ways different from learning through merely audio materials (Crystal 2001; Frigaard, 2002; Schofield & Davidson, 2003; Miner, 2004; Timucin, 2006) cited in (Ismail et al., 2010). There is evidence that co-occurring text with video can increase EFL leaners' listening comprehension (Garza, 1991). Video material can scaffold meaning as it occurs through the aural experiences of EFL learners (Lambert, 1986). Herron (1994) indicates that EFL students score higher on the final tests of listening comprehension when videos are integrated into listening classrooms. Other scholars noted that video materials found to be working as good motivating tools to increase the listening comprehension performance, as they provide EFL learners with opportunities to experience authentic settings of native speakers in ways that help students watch social and dynamic environments of real communication in English as a foreign language listening classrooms. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.