Academic journal article Asian Social Science

The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Mental Health of Pakistani Nurses: The Mediator Role of Organizational Commitment

Academic journal article Asian Social Science

The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Mental Health of Pakistani Nurses: The Mediator Role of Organizational Commitment

Article excerpt

Abstract

The present study investigates the mediating effect of organizational commitment between emotional intelligence (EI) and mental health (MH). The participants of the study were 252 nurses working in six big districts of KPK (Peshawar, Mardan, Swat, Sawabi, Charsadda & Nowshehra), Pakistan. Data were collected through Organizational Commitment Scale (Meyer, Allen, & Smith, 1993), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Zigmond & Snaith, 1983) and EI Scale (Wong & Law, 2002). Both EI and organizational commitment were significantly related to MH. The results of Structure Equation Modeling (SEM) explored that organizational commitment partially mediated the relationship between EI and MH. The final three factor model explored a significant path from EI to MH via organizational commitment. The findings discuss the effect of EI on MH.

Keywords: emotional intelligence, organizational commitment, mental health, nurses, Pakistan

1. Introduction

Emotional intelligence, organizational commitment and MH play a vital role in health care organizations. In tempestuous working environment employees move heaven and earth to create and maintain best health care of patients with limited resources (Laschinger, Finegan, & Shamian, 2001). As hospitals are the main providers of health care services to patients, it is a critical research issue to attract and retain nurses (Tallman & Bruning, 2005). This study aims at investigating the relationship among emotional intelligence, organizational commitment, MH and the mediating impact of organizational commitment between emotional intelligence and MH of Pakistani nurses. Emotional intelligence, organizational commitment and MH are thought to have a significant impact on the performance of hospitals. Recent research has diagnosed that emotional intelligence affect the performance of organizations' employees (Cote & Miners, 2006).

IE is "the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions' (Mayer, Salovey, Caruso, & Sitarenios, 2001). Wong and Law (2002) proposed the following four dimensions of emotional intelligence:

1) Self-emotion Appraisal (SEA) which refers to an employee's ability to comprehend and express his/her emotions.

2) Others' Emotion Appraisal (OEA) which refers to an employee's ability to comprehend and express the emotions of those who are around him/her.

3) Use of Emotion (UOE) which refers to the ability of an employee to use their emotions for making and achieving of goals.

4) Regulation of Emotion (ROE) which refers to the ability of an employee to control his/her emotions and make the best use of them for enhancing performance.

Organizational commitment is a psychological attachment of employees to organization for their willingness to achieve the organizations goals. Meyer and Allen (1997) defined commitment as "emotional attachment to an organization; a goals and values which results in willingness to exert optimal effort to achieve the organizations goals". Organizational commitment has three dimensions comprised of affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment (Meyer & Allen, 1991). Affective commitment is an active bond of psychological attachment of employees to their organization. Continuance commitment is the feelings of longing not to divorce from the organization because of losing the benefits earned. Normative commitment is the sense of responsibility for the organization.

Studies have revealed that health professionals such as doctors and nurses were in high risk due to many adverse effects of nerve-wracking workplace (Kirkcaldy & Martin, 2000; Tyler & Cushway, 1998). Work stressors have a significant bearing on nurses' behaviors that culminate in some serious mental problems such as depression, insomnia, anxiety and feelings of inadequacy (Wong, Leung, So, & Lam, 2001). …

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