Academic journal article Asian Social Science

The Relationship between Cognitive Emotion Regulation and Job Stress: Moderating Role of Social Support

Academic journal article Asian Social Science

The Relationship between Cognitive Emotion Regulation and Job Stress: Moderating Role of Social Support

Article excerpt

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between cognitive emotion regulation, social support and job stress. First, we investigated the relationship between cognitive emotion regulation and job stress. Second, we also have investigated that social support from work (peers or supervisors) and non-work (family or social networks) have a moderatoring effect on the relationship between cognitive emotion regulation and job stress. Based on a survey of 127 employees, we found support for our hypotheses that there is a negative relationship between cognitive emotion regulation and job stress. The results also show that work-related and non-work related social support positively moderates the relationship between cognitive emotion regulation and job stress. Results and implications are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.

Keywords: cognitive emotion regulation, work related social support, non-work related social support, job stress

1. Introduction

The relationship between regulation and stress in the workplace is gaining closer attention in the literature. The ability and to control emotion is important for employees. Given the fact that humans in general and employees in specific live in a more stressful environment, it becomes essential to successfully regulate emotions. Emotions and emotion-based behavior is at the center of any social interaction. This is also true for social interactions at the workplace. Social interactions at the workplace don't always allow for the exhibition and expression of all the emotions an individual may have. The social context at work often requires the regulation of such experiences. Cognitive coping processes have been related to the experience and expression of emotions for a considerable time.

Perceived stress refers to how much stress an individual experiences as a function of a several factors such as stressful events, coping strategies, and personality differences. Stress, in general can be understood as a result of the interaction between the person and its environment. Individuals however, are not always at liberty to act upon their emotions (Grandey, 2003). Instead they are required to control their emotions while trying to cope with a variety of stressful events (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984). Thus, a stressful environment requires emotion regulation skills.

In the present study, we are particularly interested in looking at the relationship between cognitive emotion regulation and job stress and at the moderating role of social support (Figure 1).

2. Literature Review

Emotions refer to physiological arousal and cognitive appraisal of the situation (Grandey, 2000). Emotions arise when something important to us is at stake. Emotions often result in a coordinated set of behavioral, experiential, and physiological response tendencies that together influence how we respond to perceived challenges and opportunities (Gross, 2002). By regulating the arousal and cognitions that define emotions, individuals can control their emotional expressions to fit the display rules of the situation (Goffman, 1959).

2.1 Cognitive Emotion Regulation and Job Stress

Cognitive emotion regulation can be briefly defined as the management of emotions (Garnefski & Kraaij, 2007; Thompson, 1991). It is considered as part of the broader concept of emotion regulation defined as "all the extrinsic and intrinsic processes responsible for monitoring, evaluating, and modifying emotional reactions, especially their intensive and temporal features" (Gross, 1999; Thompson, 1994). Research related to this topic has shown that emotion regulation by cognition is correlated with human life and it helps people to keep control over their emotions during or after the experience of threatening or stressful events (e.g., Garnefski et al., 2001; Garnefski, & van den Kommer et al., 2002). This cognitive emotion regulation theory considers cognitive strategies in a conceptually pure way. …

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