Academic journal article International Journal of Psychological Studies

Perceived Paternal Parenting Style and Proactive Coping Strategies of Indian Adolescents

Academic journal article International Journal of Psychological Studies

Perceived Paternal Parenting Style and Proactive Coping Strategies of Indian Adolescents

Article excerpt

Abstract

Parental child rearing practices are regarded as significant step towards development of coping skills in children and adolescents. The role of fathers in child's progress from infancy through adulthood is undeniable. The unique bond that a father and a child share is instrumental in influencing various behavioural outcomes in children. For a traditional country like India the emergence of active involvement of fathers in parenting is increasingly becoming popular. The present study investigates the influence of perceived paternal parenting styles on adolescents' coping strategies. Family structure, gender of adolescents and income of father were taken as moderators in the study. The sample of this study was N = 180 (male 45.6% and female 54.4 %). Adolescents from standard X-XI, belonging to joint family (22.8%) and nuclear family (77.2%) were selected from different schools in Kharagpur, West Bengal (India). Analysis of variance and hierarchical multiple regression analysis were carried out for data analysis. Results revealed that adolescents' perception of paternal demandingness and autonomy granting significantly predicts preventive and instrumental coping strategies among adolescents. Income of father and gender of adolescent were found to moderate the relationship between perceived paternal parenting style and coping strategies.

Keywords: adolescents, proactive coping strategies, family structure, income of father, paternal parenting styles

1. Introduction

The changing face of Indian parenting with its unique assimilation of traditional and new is promising when it comes to children's capacity development. The present day globalized society has provided a new platform to bring forth a mix of old eastern and western concepts in the area of parenting. For a traditional country like India the emergence of active involvement of fathers in parenting is increasingly becoming popular. Indian fathers are generally portrayed as authoritarian (Kakar, 1978). Nevertheless, recent researches suggest that middle-class fathers in urban India are increasingly becoming actively involved in their children's lives (Roopnarine, Talukder, Jain, Joshi, & Srivastav, 1990). Paternal involvement not only suggests a promising cultural shift in the parenting concepts of Indian fathers; but child outcomes as well. Contemporary investigations on Indian paternal parenting show significant influence on child outcomes; such as social competence (De Souza & Paul, 2013), academic achievement (Lakshmi & Arora, 2006), emotional intelligence (Shalini & Balakrishna, 2013), anxiety (Thergaonkar & Wadekar, 2007), Depression (M. Sharma, Sharma, & Yadava, 2011) and coping with emotion and stress (Bhat & Aminabhavi, 2011). However, literature specifically exploring the relationship of Indian paternal parenting style and specific coping strategies are rare.

1.1 Cultural Context in Parenting

Chao (1994), Darling and Steinberg (1993) have argued that child outcomes prompted by parenting style may be the result of differences in social environment, the cultural meaning of specific dimensions of parenting practices and parent-child interaction. The sense of being controlled or manipulated by parents in one may be associated with feelings of love and concern in a different culture (Mason, Walker-Barnes, Tu, Simons, & Martinez-Arrue, 2004). Across diverse culture the different communicative transactions that parents have with their children has given rise to a collective outlook towards child rearing. The parenting practices or specific behaviours when put under one comprehensive umbrella becomes parenting style (Spera, 2005).Darling and Steinberg (1993) regard the concept of parenting style as conglomeration of parental attitudes expressed towards children.

Darling and Toyokawa (1997) developed three subscales to assess the three dimensions of maternal parenting style: demandingness, emotional responsiveness, and psychological autonomy-granting. …

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