Academic journal article International Journal of Education and Management Studies

Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Adjustment among Adolescents

Academic journal article International Journal of Education and Management Studies

Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Adjustment among Adolescents

Article excerpt

Generally adolescence is believed to be a period of enormous stress and storm as rapid physical as well as mental changes occur during this period. Every cultural group has expectations of an individual according to their developmental stage. Successful achievement of such developmental tasks leads to happiness and help to succeed in later tasks, failure to unhappiness and a developmental lag. Certain developmental tasks to be achieved during adolescence are, achieving more mature relations with age mates, learning to perform a masculine or feminine social role, accepting one's physique and using the body effectively, achieving emotional independence of parents and other adults preparing for economic independence, preparing for marriage and family life, achieving socially responsible behavior and acquiring a set of values as a guide to behavior. To attain a good grip on above mentioned skills for life, psychological adjustment plays a crucial role in attaining them. These all skills or attributes centers around a good psychological adjustment of adolescents. Psychological adjustments can be defined as a continuous interaction between the individual's own self, with others and with the outside world. All three of these factors are constantly affecting the individual and the relationship is reciprocal (Calhoun & Acocella, 1976). Of the self that is the sum total of what already exists on the individual self, body, behavior and thoughts and feelings. Other people are people around individuals who have a major influence in the lives of individuals. The outside world is sight and smell and sound that surround the individual. Adjustment is a process by which a living organism maintains a balance between its needs and the circumstances that influence the satisfaction of these needs. Adjustment is harmonious relationship with the environment involving the ability to satisfy most of one's needs and most of the demands, both physical and social that are put upon one (Anonymous, 1968). Adjustment is a state in which the needs of the individual on the one hand and the claims of the environment on the other are fully satisfied (Anonymous, 1972). Psychological adjustment is outcome of various psychological factors, like minimal level of stress, high self concept, self esteem, motivation and emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence stands for a broader theme; rather it is like theory itself. It is an umbrella term it encompasses multiple intelligences. Emotional intelligence is comprised of interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. Emotional intelligence integrates both emotional and social skills and should be considered more importantly in psychological skills, academic skills, and it has same importance is corporate world as well. Emotional intelligence is derived from two groups of Gardner's intelligence (awareness of inner feelings and a sense of sensitivity to other people's feelings). Emotional intelligence is most important in adolescence because of the rapid emotional changes associated with adolescents' growth. It gives adolescents and teenagers a sense of control for emotion regulation. Although assumed to be mostly learned during childhood, failure to develop strong emotional intelligence usually leads to depression and aggressive behaviors during adolescence (Rathus, 2011). Social skills are also enhanced through emotional intelligence. During the adolescent period, these skills are paramount in developing skills in communication, leadership, and collaboration and cooperation (Erkman & Kourkoutas, 2011). Mayer and Salovey relate emotional intelligence to 'hot intelligences' (those that are self-centred and use emotional processing, as opposed to 'cold intelligences' that reflect information processing and have minimal emotional or self-involvement). These hot intelligences include social intelligence (Sternberg & Smith, 1985), practical intelligence (Sternberg & Caruso, 1985), and personal intelligence (Gardner, 1993). …

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