Academic journal article Journal of Marital and Family Therapy

Clinical Supervision Activities for Increasing Competence and Self-Awareness

Academic journal article Journal of Marital and Family Therapy

Clinical Supervision Activities for Increasing Competence and Self-Awareness

Article excerpt

Bean, R. A., Davis, S. D., & Davey, M. P. (Eds.). (2014). Clinical supervision activities for increasing competence and self-awareness. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 336 pp., $50.00.

It is safe to say that seasoned supervisors use their clinical knowledge and supervisory experience as their primary resources when working with supervisees. Sometimes, however, we can get into a rut in our approaches to supervision, leading to a search for creative ideas to supplement and enhance the supervision we provide. Beyond supervision textbooks, there have been few resources related to activities useful in supervision-that is, until the arrival of this book edited by Roy Bean, Sean Davis, and Maureen Davey.

This edited volume of supervision activities contains 43 chapters, almost evenly divided into two sections entitled "Core Clinical Competence" and "Diversity-Focused Competence"; all activities are designed to enhance self-awareness in supervisees. The focus of the book is squarely on the supervisee's self-of-therapist, such that there is no focus on a specific therapy constellation. Each chapter is divided into sections, including the rationale for the activity, activity instructions, an example of the activity, and guidelines for measuring supervisee progress and competence. Supervisory competence, as outlined by the editors, involves increased supervisee awareness and readiness to handle clinical concerns. The guidelines on measuring progress and competence refer to how the supervisor would see growth and development in the supervisee or how progress might be quantitatively measured. Additional resources are also provided at the end of each chapter.

Several chapter authors are notable experts in their fields, including Harry Aponte (person-ofthe-therapist) and Peggy McIntosh (privilege). Other authors are students newer to the field, faculty supervisors from academic programs, and supervisors with years of clinical and supervisory experience. All authors, with their various experiences, knowledge, and viewpoints, offer specific and detailed activities for addressing a variety of issues that emerge in supervision. Examples of supervision issues addressed in the book include developing empathy for clients, enhancing supervisee self-care, group supervision, medical genograms, working with immigrants, and exploring ageism, social class, and cisgender privilege. …

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