Academic journal article Middle East Quarterly

Arming the Sultan: German Arms Trade and Personal Diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire before World War I

Academic journal article Middle East Quarterly

Arming the Sultan: German Arms Trade and Personal Diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire before World War I

Article excerpt

Arming the Sultan: German Arms Trade and Personal Diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire before World War I. By Naci Yorulmaz. London: I. B. Tauris, 2014. 349 pp. $110.

Turkish historian Yorulmaz examines the symbiotic relationship between the relatively new empire of Kaiser Wilhelm II's Germany and the Ottoman Empire under Abdul Hamid II in the period before the conflagration of World War I. In the space of three decades following 1884, Berlin managed to push aside the French, British, and Russians and gain unprecedented influence on the geo-political and economic policies of the Ottoman government.

In essence, the kaiser wanted raw materials and markets for his industries; the sultan needed machinery to modernize his state and army. But events on the ground played a major role in effecting both leaders' thinking.

The relatively late birth of the German empire (1871) meant that Wilhelm had to watch the scramble for Africa by Europeans from the sidelines. He wrote of his uneasiness at being "squeezed in the heart of Europe by colonizing neighbors" and sought outlets both for his own ambitions and those of his industrialist subjects. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.