Academic journal article Peer Review

From the Editor

Academic journal article Peer Review

From the Editor

Article excerpt

n a 2007 issue of Liberal Education that centered on faculty leadership and institutional change, editor David Tritelli wrote, "Institutions whose mission it is to prepare students to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century are not always well served by the persistence of traditional boundaries among disciplines and departments or between the curriculum and the cocurriculum, academic affairs and student affairs, or the liberal arts and the professional fields. In fact, the primarily vertical organization of colleges and universities can create structural impediments to achieving the goals of a twenty-first-century liberal education."

However, achieving the level of change that builds institutional capacity to ensure that all students have the opportunity to do iinquiry-oriented, hands-on, and integrative work requires moving campus constituents out of their comfort zones. Mark Twain got it right when he quipped, "The only person who likes change is a wet baby." This is as true for reform of undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning as for any other significant curricular change effort.

To determine which elements are necessary for a successful STEM reform, Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) launched the STEM education effectiveness framework project, led by Susan Elrod, former executive director of PKAL and now interim provost and vice president of academic affairs at California State University-Chico. That project aimed to develop a comprehensive institutional change model to help campus leaders plan and implement evidence-based student learning and success in STEM reforms into scalable and sustainable actions. The project was funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation and engaged eleven colleges and universities in California to test evidencebased strategies that would lead to program, departmental, and eventually, institutional transformation. The project leveraged PKAL's twenty years of STEM education research and reform experience in creating more effective curricular, teaching, and program strategies. The participating institutions developed their own campus projects and, through their work, helped shape the model.

This issue of Peer Review, also sponsored by the W. …

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