Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

Missional Worship, Worshipful Mission: Gathering as God's People, Going out in God's Name

Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

Missional Worship, Worshipful Mission: Gathering as God's People, Going out in God's Name

Article excerpt

Missional Worship, Worshipful Mission: Gathering as God's People, Going Out in God's Name. By Ruth Meyers. (Calvin Institute of Christian Worship CICW, 2014. $26.00, paper.)

Drawing upon deep convictions that vital worship and vital mission are inseparably linked to one another in Christian practice, Ruth Meyers sets out to define and describe an approach to liturgical leadership and design she identifies as missional worship. What this book offers is a primer in liturgical studies written from that perspective. With extensive footnotes but an (at times) somewhat informal, first person writing style, Meyers has written a book that will best serve those whose knowledge of liturgy is primarily through experience with traditional forms of Christian worship. Aimed at traditionalists, the book nonetheless assumes a postChristendom perspective, offering an apology for missional worship and emphasizing the necessity of making Christian worship responsive to the mission of the church and accessible to those unfamiliar with Christian traditions and formal worship expressions. Written for an ecumenical audience, the book draws on the wisdom and experience of Anglican, Lutheran, Orthodox, mainline Protestant, and emergent church theologians and practitioners, making extensive use of work by Alan Kreider and Eleanor Kreiden

The first chapter defines missional worship and offers metaphors for the relationship between worship and mission. The book works with two primary images Meyers has developed, that of a spinning top and a Möbius strip, the purpose of both being to provide illustrations for the reciprocal relationship that should exist between vital worship and the missio dev, Meyers' structure for the book then builds upon the classical oudine for Eucharistic celebrations. She describes the central issues of missional worship in the gathering of the community, in the proclamation and response to the Word of God, in the prayers, in the reconciling work of the community, in the celebration of the communion meal, and in the going forth, devoting a chapter to each. …

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