Academic journal article The Hymn

Forgotten Songs: Reclaiming the Psalms for Christian Worship

Academic journal article The Hymn

Forgotten Songs: Reclaiming the Psalms for Christian Worship

Article excerpt

Forgotten Songs: Reclaiming the Psalms for Christian Worship cd. C. Richard Wells and Ray Van Neste. Nashville, TN: B & H Pub., 2012. ISBN 978-1-4336-7178-4. 242 pp. Paperback ed. $19.99.

Forgotten Songs calls the church to reclaim the psalms in its worship. Once forming the backbone of Christian daily prayer and weekly enriching the Sunday Eucharist, the psalms have all but disappeared from the life of many Christian congregations today. This collection of essays offers congregations a multiplicity of reasons for restoring the psalms to public and private worship life. The intended audience for this book is clearly evangelical Christians, especially pastors and other leaders responsible for planning worship in their congregations. However, the writing is both accessible and enjoyable enough that the book could serve a wider audience. Christian education classes seeking to deepen their knowledge and appreciation of the psalms might find this book particularly useful.

Forgotten Songs is divided into two sections. The first section seeks to provide biblical-theological grounds for including the psalms in worship. The second section offers more specific ways in which the psalms might enrich lives in today's Christian congregations. Several chapters offer solid arguments as well as practical advice regarding the use of corporately sung psalms in worship, but the calls for congregational psalmody in these chapters seem refreshingly non-prcscriptivc. Too often, writings and lectures on the psalms have argued for the use of the psalms based on their musical form, citing the fact that, since the psalms were initially written as poetry meant to be sung, we should sing psalms in our today's worship. The authors in this book, on the other hand, tend to call for the use of psalms-sung, spoken, or read-out of a place of devotion. The psalms are inherently musical, yes, but more than that they are the great devotional manual of the Church, providing God's people with a rich treasury of songs through which we can voice the many facets of our faith. Because most of the book's contributing authors come from the evangelical or the Reformed tradition, the suggested mode of psalm singing in Forgotten Songs is almost always metrical paraphrase.

The concept of worship as used by the authors in this book is significantly broader than one might expect from the title. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.