Academic journal article School Social Work Journal

School Social Workers Month: A Time for Recognition

Academic journal article School Social Work Journal

School Social Workers Month: A Time for Recognition

Article excerpt

As this issue heads to press, it is March 2015. March is designated as National Social Work Month. This year, the National Association of Social Workers' theme for social work month is "Social Work Paves the Way for Change" (NASW, 2015). In many states, the first week of March is specifically celebrated as School Social Work Week. Over the last few years, the governors of approximately half of the states in the United States have issued proclamations that recognize school social work week and the roles that school social workers play in paving the way for change in the education of children. These states include Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin (School Social Work Association of America, 2015). It is a testament to school social workers that these states have each issued proclamations honoring school social workers for the work they do.

A typical proclamation begins with the acknowledgement that school social workers in that state and across the United States serve as vital members of the educational team. The proclamations recognize that school social workers play a central role in creating a positive school climate and serve as the link between home, school, and community in ensuring students' academic success. The proclamations note that school social workers have special skills in working with students who face serious challenges to their school success. Some of the problems listed in the proclamations include mental health, poverty, disability, discrimination, abuse, addiction, bullying, parental divorce, grief and loss, behavior difficulties, crises, and other barriers to learning. …

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