Academic journal article Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Truth Is Stanger Than It Used to Be

Academic journal article Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Truth Is Stanger Than It Used to Be

Article excerpt

Truth Is Stranger Than It Used to Be. By J. Richard Middleton and Brian Walsh. Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 1995, 250 pp., n.p.

Middleton and Walsh have collaborated previously on a worldview book entitled The Transforming Vision, in which they set forth a distinctive Christian perspective based on creation, fall and redemption that answers the questions everyone asks: "Who am I? Where am I? What is wrong? What is the remedy?" Here they are interested in demonstrating that truth for the postmodern mind is no longer true. Correspondence and coherence theories of knowledge and truth do not work because reality itself is now no longer *out there" but "in here" as a construct of our mind. Thus "both epistemologically (in terms of what we can know) and morally (in terms of what is right), reality isn't what it used to be" (p. 29).

If even the given is a construct of our conceptualization, then their previous worldview book will mean little to the postmodern consciousness. While liberalism permitted a plurality of worldviews and personal beliefs there were always public truths, and the Christian could make his case the best he could. Today, however, everything is private. There are no public or universal truths. Everything is a product of language and social relationships, including the Christian message. How then is the Christian community to share the "gospel truth," remembering that "truth is sought and found only in community" (p. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.