Academic journal article Boston University Law Review

War Powers and the Constitution: A Symposium on Stephen M. Griffin's Long Wars and the Constitution and Mariah Zeisberg's War Powers: The Politics of Constitutional Authority

Academic journal article Boston University Law Review

War Powers and the Constitution: A Symposium on Stephen M. Griffin's Long Wars and the Constitution and Mariah Zeisberg's War Powers: The Politics of Constitutional Authority

Article excerpt

EDITORS' FOREWORD

The Boston University Law Review is pleased to publish this Symposium on Stephen M. Griffin's Long Wars and the Constitution and Mariah Zeisberg's War Powers: The Politics of Constitutional Authority. The Symposium is the fourth in the Boston University Law Review's series of symposia on significant recent books in law. Each has focused on two books that join issue on an important topic: the Law Review invites each author to write an essay on the other's book and invites several Boston University faculty to write an essay on one or both books.

The live Symposium took place on October 30, 2014 at Boston University School of Law. It focused on the longstanding debate surrounding war powers through modern U.S. history, specifically the sharing and contesting of authority between the President and the Congress to make war. The panelists considered these issues through the lenses of Professor Griffin's and Professor Zeisberg's contrasting views regarding the balance of powers in our constitutional system. While Griffin argued that Zeisberg's theory of authority "risks running away from the original meaning of the constitutional text, which clearly gives Congress the authority to declare war," Zeisberg rejected the notion that there is a clear rule that decides who should ultimately have the power to make war. …

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