Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

The Validation of a Learning Ability Assessment Scale in Chinese Children with Learning Difficulties

Academic journal article International Journal of Child Health and Human Development

The Validation of a Learning Ability Assessment Scale in Chinese Children with Learning Difficulties

Article excerpt

Introduction

The implementation of the one child policy in China has caused more attention to be directed to the quality of children's life and development. Learning has always been valued highly in Chinese culture. In recent years families have invested increasing amounts of money in education as the result of the economic improvement in society and the increase in family income. China has long-standing and traditional cultural beliefs about rearing children, such as "passing ideas on to the next generation", "extending one's life through one's child", "having one's child rising up in the world", and "doing credit to one's ancestors" etc. Guided by these philosophies, parents have been forced to place their hopes and dreams in their one child, investing their time, energy, money and intellect as much as possible in the development of the one child. Young Chinese parents make elaborate plans for their one child, often forgetting their child's personal interests and talents. Although different parents have different expectations of their children's achievements, most young parents pursue whatever methods come to mind, and use whatever resources they have access to, in order to fulfill their expectations. Parenting styles could be described as either protective, or lenient, or even indulgent. The traditional parent-child relationship in which the parent is the authority to whom deference, obedience, and respect is paid, is changing. Many children in one child families are now acting as if they are the authority figures, simply because so much attention has been directed to them and so much value placed upon them. Parents are so eager to protect their children and do things for them, that many children perform at disappointing level educationally. Parents often use inconsistent parenting methods and do not encourage their children as they might (1).

Most Chinese studies of achievement however suggest that single children outperform others in academic achievement (2). This finding is consistent with the western finding of academic advantage among single children (3). On the other hand, studies in the personality area suggest that single children are low in independent thinking, persistence, behavior control and adjustment, cooperation, peer prestige, and frustration tolerance and are egotistical. However, few studies have been done on children with depression in China, especially since the introduction of the one child policy which has made the child's learning a major focus in the family.

It is widely recognized that learning problems occur in about 16 percent of children in western societies (4). China is no exception with a prevalence of learning difficulties that is about 10.3% (5). Such a high percentage of children with learning problems in the context of China's large population and its current family size policy is a major concern. It has been found that Chinese primary school children often have no time to play, they spend about 8 hours studying in school, and 4 hours doing assignments at home. However, they are still interested in playing outside, painting, sports and other play activities (1). The possible outcome of competitive study among children is that they develop poorer motor abilities, for example, eye hand coordination, because they have less time to practice their motor ability in play, outside activities, and so forth. The cumulative effect is that these children's overall ability does not develop in concert with the goals of their school programs. Children with learning problems are often found to have deficits in visual attention (6), visual perceptual and visual motor abilities (7), memory (8,9), and language (9). They also have low school achievement and behavior problems (10). Deficits in attention, motor ability and behavior suggest that children may have an uneven development in visual, auditory and motor abilities. Interventions should aim to improve the child's achievement in reading, mathematics and academic ability generally. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.