Academic journal article Flannery O'Connor Review

Photographs from Andalusia

Academic journal article Flannery O'Connor Review

Photographs from Andalusia

Article excerpt

This slingblade was beneath the floor of the Equipment Shed's tack room in a large rats' nest. It seemed hidden under there. Note this reference in an O'Connor letter:

One of my peachickens turned up last week without a foot-cut plumb in two, I suspect by somebody's sling blade. It fell off in two days-or rather as it was just hanging by a thread I cut it off and now the victim is doing fine but I don't know what I am going to do with a one-legged peacock. (18 May 1957, HB 219)

The Nail House in the 1960s was still strong and stable. It was in O'Connor's immediate sight in the portion of Andalusia's yard where she could walk and study the farm. Near the Nail House, O'Connor might have imagined, or heard, Mrs. Cope worry about the farm burning in "A Circle in the Fire." It was near it where O'Connor could see peafowl roost in the crepe myrtles that grow nearby when she wrote her essay "The King of the Birds." On its roof in the 1960s, Mary Jo Thompson took a picture of a peacock in full display. The Nail House is near the original aviary below the water tower directly behind the main house, but the once faded red barn structure has deteriorated into a pile of mostly rotted weather-greyed boards that have fallen into history. A path lined with resurrection lilies can still be seen leading there. …

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