Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Healthcare Management and Leadership

Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Healthcare Management and Leadership

Article excerpt

Managers within healthcare include senior doctors, nurses and allied specialised health professionals, those managing general practitioner (GP) practices and hospitals, often with annual turnovers of £1billion plus. In 2013, the National Health Service (NHS) alone employed 147,087 doctors, 371,777 qualified nursing staff and 36,360 managers.

Over recent decades, there has been a worldwide culture shift towards professional managers. The Griffiths Report (1983) heralded the age of general management in the NHS. A move towards managers having operational control at every level of the organisation and relieving clinicians of strategic responsibility was seen as the way to transform healthcare to resemble successful private and commercial organisations. This model of management may have appealed to policy makers wanting to exercise political reform in healthcare systems, but new models are replacing it, increasingly focusing on putting clinicians in leadership roles.

Structural change within any organisation almost invariably leads to tensions. Constant reform in the NHS has played its part in putting strain on the relationship between clinicians and managers. Multi-disciplinary working is therefore crucial, as is being able to lead a team effectively. Part of this is fostering a culture of self-improvement. …

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