Academic journal article Journal of Positive Management

Conditions for Creativity in an Organization

Academic journal article Journal of Positive Management

Conditions for Creativity in an Organization

Article excerpt

1. Introduction

The ability to be distinct in the market constitutes a desirable competence of contemporary organizations. It is above all determined by creativity and innovativeness, both of management board and employees. Organizations are increasingly seeking to foster creativity, because it is an important source of organizational innovation as well as competitive advantage (Beheshtifar and Kamani-Fard, 2013). Creativity as creative thinking, unconventionally precedes innovativeness and frequently constitutes its causative factor. Nowadays, these two values characterise entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviours. As organizations become more complex and are confronted with increasingly difficult challenges associated with globalization, technology, risk management, and driving innovation, the entrepreneurial role emphasized by Schumpeter becomes more important than ever (Handfield et al., 2009). As postulated by J. Schumpeter, an entrepreneur is an innovator who implements new combination of manufacturing factors and who has never been required to be an inventor. Entrepreneurship, however, is directly associated with an entrepreneur - a man of action who makes something happen (Jaremczuk, 2004), whilst a feature constituting an entrepreneurial attitude and behaviour is different thinking, which promotes unconventional, innovative solutions of creative thinking. A talented Schumpeterian entrepreneur presented different way of thinking exactly when he introduced new combinations of production factors, using a constantly new offer of innovative solutions [1] that were appearing in the market thanks to creators. J. Schumpeter while interpreting entrepreneurship as "an entrepreneur's peculiar state of mind, which releases the power within to overcome all obstacles, their own prejudices and reluctance, and enables the entrepreneur to go against the tide in unknown circumstances" (Mikosik, 1993), simultaneously points out to the need to reveal creative abilities. Nowadays, creative abilities are expected from all participants of an organization. However, as postulated by J. Lipowska, they are frequently expressed in a formal way in competitive systems or systems of assessing employees (Lipowska, 2013). But, it is not enough to formulate expectations towards employees, since T. Amabile's research proves that just telling people that they should be creative doesnotlead to an increase in their creativeness (Amabile, 1979). One should shape certain organizational conditions and a style of management, so that creative thinking and unconventional problem-solving are stimulated.

In the light of the aforementioned conditions, the aim of this paper is to identify key factors of shaping conditions conducive to creativity in organizations. According to the authors, essential prerequisites were workers' subjectivity, which determines the sense of leadership, participatory management style and organizational climate shaping the conditions for teamwork. The present paper draws attention to the process of empowerment of employees as a baseline determinant of organizational creativity. This thesis builds up onthe research presented by K. Jaremczuk in the work entitled "Subjectivity of an Employee in the Organization (2012).

2. Theoretical aspects of creativeness and conditions for an increase in its significance in the process of organization's development and functioning

The ability to think creatively constitutes the basis for an innovative change that implies development. Joy Paul Guilford (1950), who pointed out to an divergent thinking ability, disparate as a condition for finding new solutions, is considered the forerunner of the creative thinking theory. Guilford, while describing the difference between divergent and convergent abilities, states that it is pertinent to a way of thinking between two categories: necessity and choice. Convergent thinking consists in looking for one, appropriate way of problem-solving. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.