Academic journal article Childhood Obesity

Preschool-Adapted Liking Survey (PALS): A Brief and Valid Method to Assess Dietary Quality of Preschoolers

Academic journal article Childhood Obesity

Preschool-Adapted Liking Survey (PALS): A Brief and Valid Method to Assess Dietary Quality of Preschoolers

Article excerpt

[Author Affiliation]

Mastaneh Sharafi. 1 Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

Heather Peracchio. 2 Department of Extension, College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

Stephanie Scarmo. 3 Kids' Safe and Healthful Foods, Government Performance, The Pew Charitable Trusts, Washington, DC.

Tania B. Huedo-Medina. 1 Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

Susan T. Mayne. 4 Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.

Brenda Cartmel. 4 Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.

Valerie B. Duffy. 1 Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

(Susan T. Mayne is currently affiliated with: Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration.)

Adddress correspondence to: Valerie B. Duffy, PhD, RD, Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, 358 Mansfield Road, Unit 2101, Storrs, CT 06269-2101, E-mail: valerie.duffy@uconn.edu

Introduction

Since the 1970s, childhood obesity prevalence has increased worldwide. Although in recent years there has been a decreasing trend in obesity rate among preschoolers, approximately 1 of 4 preschoolers in the United States are currently overweight or obese.1 Preschool centers can be ideal settings to work in tandem with parents to establish a healthy diet in children that can persist into adulthood.2-5 Feasible, yet valid, tools are needed to assess children's dietary behavior for program planning and tailored interventions. Dietary assessments in young children are subjective (e.g., parent/caregiver reported)6,7 or objective (e.g., plate waste,8 digital imaging9,10 ). Parent-reported dietary assessment tools (e.g., recalls/records, frequency questionnaire) can be burdensome to complete and time/cost intensive to interpret6,7 and have rarely been validated against emerging objective measures, such as nutrient and energy biomarkers. A recent review suggests the need for short surveys that allow parents/caregivers to easily report their child's usual intake, minimize risk of misreporting, and assess food consumption as well as overall dietary quality.7 The present study included a parent-reported, simple liking survey in children attending in government-supported preschool programs.

A liking survey is a novel dietary assessment tool,11-15 with the assumption that we generally eat what is liked and avoid what is not. Survey-reported food likes/dislikes correspond with intake assessed by frequency survey or food records,12,14,16,17 whereas liking for fruits/vegetables corresponds with carotenoid status,18 fish with serum fatty acids,19 and fatty foods with adiposity.12,17 Ideally, assessment tools should be able to capture overall dietary patterns or dietary quality. Among adults, there are consistent positive associations between dietary quality indexes and serum carotenoid status, a biomarker of fruit and vegetable consumption.20-24 Few studies have validated indexes of dietary quality against nutritional biomarkers in children25 ; instead, the indices are compared with other self-reported surveys.26 The emergence of Raman Resonance spectroscopy (RRS), an objective, noninvasive indicator of carotenoid status, provides an opportunity to validate dietary quality indices among preschoolers.18,27-30

How closely a child's liking for foods and beverages corresponds with what they consume at home and extending to school is influenced by parental feeding practices, strategies that parents use to encourage or discourage consumption. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.