Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Understanding the Structural, Human Resource, Political, and Symbolic Dimensions of Implementing and Sustaining Interprofessional Education

Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Understanding the Structural, Human Resource, Political, and Symbolic Dimensions of Implementing and Sustaining Interprofessional Education

Article excerpt

This study investigated the perceptions of deans and faculty members of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) concerning the degree to which their institutions' implement and integrate the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic frames or dimensions of interprofessional education (IPE). The study identified correlations among these frames/dimensions, including their relationship with overall IPE program progress and success. METHODS: This study utilized a nonexperimental comparative descriptive and correlational survey design. The instrument was developed by the researchers and administered online using a readily accessible data collection process. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Content validity and reliability were established prior to full implementation of the survey. RESULTS: Results revealed high levels of interest but lower levels of progress and success in implementing the various frames/dimensions of IPE. Strong correlations existed between the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic dimensions of IPE, and these dimensions individually and collectively predicted overall IPE program progress and success. CONCLUSION: The differences between interest and performance raised important questions and led to conclusions about leadership effectiveness, organizational clarity, and the process of implementing the organizational change needed for effective IPE at ASAHP institutions. J Allied Health 2015; 44(3):152-157.

THE TRANSFORMATION of health professions education is gaining widespread interest and support. The transformation envisioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) and others would enable health professions students to engage in interprofessional learning with those outside their discipline as a routine part of their pre- and post-licensure education. The ultimate aim of interprofessional education (IPE) is to "prepare all health professions students for deliberately working together with the common goal of building a safer and better ... health care system."1(p3)

Notwithstanding the increased calls for IPE and growing evidence of its benefits, most health science colleges and universities have not yet wholly embraced the principles and practices of IPE.2,3 Although theoretical and managerial frameworks, as well as barriers and successes, to this practice innovation are widely reported in current literature, new ways of thinking about the organization and delivery of IPE are needed.3-6

Overview of the Study

This study engaged the work of Bolman and Deal7 in the application of the four frames of leadership and organizational process to the IPE of health professionals at health sciences colleges and universities across the United States. Bolman and Deal advanced a powerful and provocative framework for thinking about organizations and the initiatives they pursue. Their model consolidated major schools of organizational thought into a comprehensive framework encompassing four perspectives-or frames: structural, human resource (HR), political, and symbolic (Table 1).

Bolman and Deal's discussion of frames emphasized "the unique features of four distinctive ways to think about organizations"7(p309) and that harmonizing or viewing the frames in combination results in a more accurate and robust view of an organization, initiative, or situation at hand. Ormerod8 argued that endeavors usually fail because decision-makers do not understand their environments well enough to anticipate the consequences of their actions. Bolman and Deal observed that "in studying scores of innovations, we continue to see managers whose strategies are limited because their thinking is limited to one or two cognitive lenses."7(p377) To facilitate interprofessional education and eventual collaborative care, changes are needed in attitudes, in systems, and in operations.9 Addressing and harmonizing the relevant structural, HR, political, and symbolic frames or dimensions of IPE is essential to effectively implement and sustain IPE

Purpose: This study investigated the perceptions of Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP)-affiliated deans and faculty regarding the level of institutional interest in IPE and the degree to which their institutions' implemented the structural, HR, political, and symbolic frames/dimensions of IPE. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.